Unediting the Renaissance: Shakespeare, Marlowe, Milton

By Leah S. Marcus | Go to book overview

NOTES

1 INTRODUCTION
1
Frederick C. Crews, The Pooh Perplex (1963; reprinted New York: E.P. Button, 1965).
2
For work representative of the new currents mentioned here, see D.F. McKenzie, “Printers of the Mind: Some Notes on Bibliographical Theories and Printing-House Practices,” Studies in Bibliography 22 (1969): 1-75; and his Panizzi Lectures 1985: Bibliography and the Sociology of Texts (London: British Library, 1986); Philip Gaskell, From Writer to Reader: Studies in Editorial Method (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1978); Jerome J. McGann, A Critique of Modern Textual Criticism (1983; paperback edition Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1985); his The Beauty of Inflections: Literary Investigations in Historical Method and Theory (1985; reprinted Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1988); and his Black Riders: The Visible Language of Modernism (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993); D.C. Greetham, Textual Scholarship: An Introduction (New York and London: Garland, 1992); his forthcoming Theories of the Text (Oxford: Oxford University Press); and Robert Darnton, “What Is the History of Books?” Daedalus 111 (1982): 65-83, and reprinted in his The Kiss of Lamourette (New York: W.W. Norton, 1990), pp. 107-35.

For the new work specifically in the field of Renaissance/early modern studies, see, for example, the Shakespearean studies by Steven Urkowitz, Shakespeare’s Revision of King Lear (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1980); Gary Taylor and Michael Warren, eds, The Division of the Kingdoms: Shakespeare’s Two Versions of King Lear (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1983); Stanley Wells, “The Unstable Image of Shakespeare’s Text,” in Images of Shakespeare: Proceedings of the Third Congress of the International Shakespeare Association, 1986, ed. Werner Habicht, D.J. Palmer, and Roger Pringle (Newark: University of Delaware Press; London and Toronto: Associated University Presses, 1988), pp. 305-13; Random Cloud [Randall McLeod], “The Marriage of Good and Bad Quartos,” Shakespeare Quarterly 33 (1982): 421-31; Michael D. Bristol, Shakespeare’s America, America’s Shakespeare (London and New York: Routledge, 1990), especially chap. 4, “Editing the Text: The Deuteronomic Reconstruction of Authority,” pp. 91-119; and the witty summation in Margreta de Grazia and Peter Stallybrass, “The Materiality of the Shakespearean Text,” Shakespeare Quarterly 44 (1993): 255-83, which appeared after most of the present study was written but clearly anticipates a number of my arguments. For more general studies focussed on the period, see, for example, Elizabeth L. Eisenstein, The Printing Press as an Agent of Change, 2 vols (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1979); Roger

-228-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Unediting the Renaissance: Shakespeare, Marlowe, Milton
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Preface and Acknowledgements ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Textual Instability and Ideological Difference 38
  • 3 - Purity and Danger in the Modern Edition 68
  • 4 - The Editor as Tamer 101
  • 5 - Bad Taste and Bad Hamlet 132
  • 6 - John Milton’s Voice 177
  • Notes 228
  • Index 263
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.