The Beginnings of European Theorizing--Reflexivity in the Archaic Age - Vol. 2

By Barry Sandywell | Go to book overview

SUBJECT INDEX

a
Achaean(s) xv , 60 , 61 , 72 , 73 , 75 , 76 , 111
and throughout chapter 2;
army/confederacy 76 , 81 , 84 -5
Achilles 39 , 40 , 60 , 62 , 63 , 68 , 75 , 77 , 81 , 94 ;
anger 105 -6, 109 -10, 118 , 122 -3, 155 , 252 ;
loss of self 60 -2, 78 , 79 , 84 , 110 -12, 276 ;
and melancholy 117 -18;
multiple self 110 -11;
as orator 74 , 110 -11, 123 -4, 158 , 336 -7n30;
reconciliation with Priam 90 ;
as reflexive agent 78
Achilles’ shield 64 , 71 -2, 92 -3, 213
Acragas (Akragas) 258
action:
in the Homeric epic 59 - 77
Aegean:
Cretan-Minoan hegemony 136 -9;
Mycenaean domination 136 -40
aesthetic (aisthesis):
analysis;
differentiation 14 - 15
aesthetics:
social differentiation of aesthetic forms 12 - 26 ;
lyric origins of the ‘aesthetic object’ 212 -17, 252
affectivity:
in lyric poetry 215 , 220 -1, 233 and passim;
phenomenology of 220 ;
in Sappho 233 -6;
see everyday life
Agamemnon 39 , 60 , 62 , 63 , 66 -7, 75 , 77 , 78 , 79 , 81 , 84 , 94 , 109 , 111 , 122 , 127 , 136 , 155 , 157 , 176 , 239 ;
mental conflict 130 ;
lack of persuasive speech 125
agon30 ;
agonism in cultural change 165 ;
agonism in the epic 60 - 77 , 100 -23;
agonism in games 120 -1, 257 -63;
agonism in Hesiod’s Theogony44 , 181 -2, 182 -94;
agonistic nature of early Greek culture 43 -6, 79 - 94 , 165 -6, 180 -94, 354 -5n3, 366 n2, 375 -6n1;
in Pindar 253 -63;
poetry competitions 168 , 212 -13;
theme of themes of the Iliad64 , 83 -4
agora85
Aither 198
Ajax 61 , 69 , 81 , 84 , 111 , 123 -4
aletheia, alethic (truth, truthlike) 7 , 175 , 176 -8, 183 , 269 -70, 270 -4, 378 n13;
see also truth
alethic dialectic 181 -2, 259
Alexander the Great 56
Alexandria 57
Alexandrian Museum/Library 57 ;
destruction of 57
alienation:
see Orphism
allegory 4 - 6 , 11 - 12 , 24 , 43 , 64 , 92 , 99 , 182 , 190 , 207 ;
and interpretation in Biblical narrative 92 -3, 333 n22;
in Mimnermus 237 -8;
and philosophical speculation 184 -5, 288 -9;
in Pherecydes 289 ;
in Pindar, 266 -8, 268 -74, 274 -5;
in Plato 292 ;
in Sappho 235 -6
alphabetization 43 , 48 -9, 51 , 55 -6, 148 -50, 168 , 320 -2n3, 355 -6n4, 365 -6n2
alphabets:
Canaanite 347 -8n59;
Greek xv , 43 , 48 , 51 , 53 , 56 , 136 -9, 142 -3, 167 -8, 320 -2n3, 340 -1n42, 365 -6n2;
Phoenician 142 , 365 n2
analogy:
in ancient mythology 42
ananke35
Andromache 68 , 73 , 117
anthropomorphism:
of archaic narrative 42 -3;
of Greek myth 4 - 6 , 42 , 85 , 94 , 164 -9
Antigone 152 -4, 203
aoidoi (singers or bards) 53 , 54 , 125 -6, 162 , 324 n6;
the aoidos as charismatic

-415-

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The Beginnings of European Theorizing--Reflexivity in the Archaic Age - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Abbreviations x
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1 - Mythopoiesis 1
  • 2 - Homeric Epic Reflexivity 47
  • 3 - Hesiod and the Birth of the Gods 160
  • 4 - Lyric Reflexivities 206
  • 5 - Pindar and the Age of Literary Consciousness 250
  • 6 - Orphism 278
  • Notes 302
  • Bibliography 386
  • Name Index 411
  • Subject Index 415
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