Damaged Life: The Crisis of the Modern Psyche

By Tod Sloan | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I wish to thank John Broughton for his patient support for this project and his excellent critical comments on various versions of the manuscript. I am grateful to my friends Peter Stromberg and Lamont Lindstrom for sharing insights from the field of cultural anthropology. Randy Earnest and Barnaby Barratt helped me think through a number of issues in psychoanalytic and critical theory. Isabel Vega deserves special thanks for consistently urging me to consider the other side of the coin on each issue. Susan Chase, Theresa Fassihi and MacAndrew Jack gave many helpful suggestions for revisions. I also wish to thank Beacon Press for permission to reproduce Figures 3.1 and 3.2 on pages 54 and 55. These were taken from The Theory of Communicative Action, Volume 2, by Juergen Habermas (1995).

Many of the ideas presented here were developed in conversations with seminar students at the Universidad Central de Venezuela, the University of Tulsa and the Universidad de Costa Rica. Les agradezco a todos por su interés y solidaridad. Financial support for some portions of this work was provided by a Fulbright research grant (1987), a summer fellowship and travel grant from the University of Tulsa (1988, 1991) and a travel grant from the Ford Foundation (1989).

I dedicate this volume to my son Daniel, now seven, whose love for life—and certain aspects of modernity—has already rekindled mine a thousand times.

-ix-

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Damaged Life: The Crisis of the Modern Psyche
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Chapter 1 - Damaged Goods: the Modern Problematic 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Psychological Impact of Modernization 23
  • Chapter 3 - The Colonization of the Lifeworld 47
  • Chapter 4 - The Formation of the Psyche 67
  • Chapter 5 - The Domination of Desire 81
  • Chapter 6 - Ideological Formations and Their Transcendence 96
  • Chapter 7 - The Destruction of Meaning 110
  • Chapter 8 - Decolonization 127
  • References 147
  • Index 155
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