Managing Resources for School Improvement: Creating a Cost-Effective School

By Hywel Thomas; Jane Martin | Go to book overview

Chapter 5

Broome School

Encouraging growth

A VIEW OF THE SCHOOL

Broome School is an 11-16 co-educational comprehensive school situated in the central area of a large city. The number on roll is a little over 600 pupils and the standard number is 210. The number on roll has declined slightly since 1987 but the intake trend is now upwards. In 1992 the school admitted 58 per cent of its standard number with 54 per cent having expressed the school as a first choice. The school has an attendance rate which has remained at about 83 per cent since 1987 but is now showing an improvement with 86 per cent in attendance in 1992. The school had no exclusions in 1991-2.

The pupil intake has changed over recent years. Having taken 75 per cent Asian pupils, the school now takes 50 per cent Bengali and Bangla-deshi with 5-10 per cent mixed race; 15 per cent of the intake is Afro-Caribbean—a growing sector—and 15 per cent white pupils. In 1992 approximately 70 per cent of the intake have English as a second language and 88 per cent are entitled to free school meals. The school recruits pupils from a wide area within the inner city; 0.3 per cent are statemented for special needs.

In 1993 the school had a teaching staff complement of 37 plus four Section 11 teachers and two teachers of English as a second language. The pupil teacher ratio is 16:1 and the overall average teaching load is 73 per cent. Nine support staff include two full-time technicians, two part-time library assistants, one part-time home economics technician, one part-time reprographics technician, one full-time clerical and two part-time clerical assistants. The school has no vacancies on the governing body which meets twice per term.

The school has been locally managed since April 1990. Owing to the proximity of a number of schools, the pattern of local housing and demographic change in the local area, the school is in a highly competitive situation. The head teacher recognises that maintaining an intake of 600, while a nearby school has only 280, has been an achievement which she

-93-

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Managing Resources for School Improvement: Creating a Cost-Effective School
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vi
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Part I - Linking Resources to Improvement 1
  • Chapter 1 - Resources and Improvement 3
  • Chapter 2 - Reforming Resource Management 10
  • Chapter 3 - The Cost-Effective School 20
  • Part II - Resourcing Improvement in Practice 47
  • Chapter 4 - Managing Resources for Improvement in 15 Schools 49
  • Chapter 5 - Broome School 93
  • Chapter 6 - Skelton High School 115
  • Chapter 7 - Whittaker School 137
  • Part III - Securing Improvement 159
  • Chapter 8 - Assessing Improvement 161
  • Chapter 9 - Sustaining Improvement 181
  • Appendix 188
  • References 192
  • Index 196
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