Segregation and Apartheid in Twentieth-Century South Africa

By William Beinart; Saul Dubow | Go to book overview

NOTES
*
I would like to thank William Beinart, Jacklyn Cock, Peter Delius, Shula Marks, Julie Wells, Marcia Wright and the ‘Women in South African History’ group for their helpful comments on earlier drafts of this article—but to absolve them from responsibility for the errors and oversimplifications which undoubtedly remain in the present version.
1
Shulamith Firestone, The Dialectic of Sex (London, 1971).
2
See Kate Millett, Sexual Politics (London, 1969).
3
‘Patriarchy’ is a controversial term, retained in this discussion only with certain provisos discussed below. For discussions concerning the use of the term see Shelia Rowbotham, ‘The Trouble with Patriarchy’, and S. Alexander and B. Taylor, ‘In Defence of “Patriarchy”’, both in R. Samuel (ed.), Peoples History and Socialist Theory (London, 1981). See also the discussions by Michele Barrett, Woman’s Oppression Today (London, 1980), ch. 8; and Gayle Rubin, ‘The Traffic in Women’ in A.M. Jaggar and P.R. Struhl (eds), Feminist Frameworks (New York, 1978).
4
Barrett, Woman’s Oppression.
5
Women’s organized resistance in South African history has been discussed in several recent papers. See C. Kros, ‘Urban African Women’s Organisations and Protest on the Rand from the Years 1939-1956’, BA Honours dissertation (University of the Witwatersrand, 1978); J. Yawitch, ‘Natal 1959: The Women’s Protests’, paper presented to the Conference on the History of Opposition in Southern Africa, 1978; C. Walker, ‘The Federation of South African Women’, paper presented to the Conference on the History of Opposition in Southern Africa, 1978; B. Kaim, ‘The New Surgery: The Illicit Liquor Problem on the Rand, 1920-1945’, Sociology III Project, University of the Witwatersrand, 1978; I. Obery, ‘Makabongwe Amakosikazi! The FSAW and Mass Struggle in the 50’s’, Africa Perspective, 15 (Autumn, 1980), 36-41; J. Wells, ‘Women’s Resistance to Passes in Bloemfontein during the Inter-War Period’, Africa Perspective, 15 (Autumn, 1980), 16-35; J. Yawitch, unpublished essay on the Bafurutse Revolt against passes; J. Wells, ‘The Day the Town Stood Still: Women in Resistance in Potchefstroom, 1912-1930’, in B. Bozzoli (ed.), Town and Countryside in the Transvaal (Johannesburg, 1983); R.de Villiers, ‘The Resistance to the Extension of Passes to African Women, 1954-60’, unpublished paper; Cherryl Walker, ‘Women in Twentieth Century South African Politics: The Federation of South African Women, its Roots, Growth and Decline’, MA thesis (University of Cape Town, 1978); and T. Lodge, ‘Women’s Protest Movements in the 1950s’, unpublished ms.
6
C. Stone, ‘Industrialisation and Female Labour Force Participation’; and J. Westmore and P. Townsend, ‘The African Women Workers in the Textile Industry in Durban’, South African Labour Bulletin, 2, 4, 1976.
7
See L. Callinicos, ‘Domesticating Workers’, South African Labour Bulletin, 2, 4, 1976, 60-8.

-141-

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