Contested Memories: Poles and Jews during the Holocaust and Its Aftermath

By Joshua D. Zimmerman | Go to book overview

Notes
1
Archiwum Urzędu Rady Ministrów (Archive of the Office of the Council of Ministers, hereafter cited as AURM), housed in the Archive of New Records, Warsaw (hereafter cited as AAN), Prezydium Rady Ministrów (Presidium of the Council of Ministers, hereafter cited as PRM), 5/137, pp. 11–14, Report of the Office for Aiding the Jewish Population, June 1945. The Office for Aiding the Jewish Population was established on 8 August 1944 and charged with general help in Lublin and liberated areas. See MichaŁ Szulkin, “Sprawozdania z dziaŁalności Referatu dla Spraw Pomocy Ludności Żydowskiej w Polsce przy Prezydium PKWN,” BŻIH 1 (1971): 75–90.
2
Yitzhak Zuckerman, A Surplus of Memory: Chronicle of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, trans. and ed. Barbara Harshav (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1993), 581. The CKŻP oversaw the activities of local Jewish committees and numerous Jewish economic, educational, and health institutions. It included almost all legal Jewish political parties: Bund, Poale Zion-Left and Poale Zion-Right, Ihud, Hashomer Hatzair, and Jewish Communists (members of the Polish Workers’ Party). On the CKŻP and its activities, see, among others, Helena Datner-Śpiewak, “SzkoŁy Centralnego Komitetu Żydów w Polsce w latach 1944–1949,” BŻIH 1–3, no. 169–171 (1994): 101–119; Helena Datner-Śpiewak, “Instytucje opieki nad dzieckiem i szkoŁy powszechne Centralnego Komitetu Żydów w Polsce w latach 1944–1949,” BŻIH 3 (1981): 37–51; David Engel, “The Reconstruction of Jewish Communal Institutions in Postwar Poland: Central Committee of Polish Jews, 1944– 1946,” East European Politics and Societies 10, no. 1 (1996): 85–107; and Hana Szlomi, “The Communist Caucus in the Central Committee of Jews in Poland, November 1944–February 1947,” Gal-Ed 13 (1993): 81–100.
3
Two different reports presenting the situation of the Jews in Poland listed antisemitism as one of the main reasons for Jewish emigration from the country: (1) Memorandum submitted by the CKŻP to the Anglo-American Committee of Enquiry in the spring of 1946 (Memorandum do Komisji Anglo-Amerykańskiej dla Spraw Palestyny) and (2) the Report of the Government Secretary for the Productivization of the Jewish Population, 12 June 1947 (Sprawozdanie z dziaŁalności Komisarza Rządu za caŁy okres); see, respectively, AŻIH (Archive of the Jewish Historical Institute, Warsaw, Poland), CKŻP Sekretariat 25 b; and AAN, Ministerstwo Admininistracji Publicznej (Ministry of Public Administration, hereafter cited as MAP), 287, 2.
4
In this chapter, I shall use the term “antisemitism” to refer to violent attacks on Jewish individuals, groups, and communities.
5
See Anna Cichopek, Pogrom Żydów w Krakowie 11 sierpnia 1945 r. (Warsaw: Żydowski Instytut Historyczny, 2000). For the Kielce pogrom, see BoŻena Szaynok, Pogrom Żydów w Kielcach 4 lipca 1946 (WrocŁaw: Bellona, 1992); Krystyna Kersten, Polacy, Żydzi, Komunizm: Antynomia póŁprawd (Warsaw: NiezaleŻna Oficyna Wydawnicza, 1992), 89–142; and Yisrael Gutman, Ha-yehudim be-polin aharei milhemet ha-olam ha-shniya (Jerusalem: Zalman Shazar Center for Jewish History, 1985), 34–41.
6
Regarding blood libel accusation, see AŻIH, CKŻP, Komisja Specjalna, 303/7, 1947, pp. 8–9, “Report on the activities of the Special Commission of the Central Committee of Jews in Poland,” Warsaw, 30 May 1947. Postwar antisemitic leaflets from Lubartów and Kraśnik are found in AURM, PRM, 5/137, p. 11; Archiwum Państwowe

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