Debating the Death Penalty: Should America Have Capital Punishment? The Experts on Both Sides Make Their Best Case

By Hugo Adam Bedau; Paul G. Cassell | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book and the public symposium that preceded it would not have transpired without support from several sources. Martha Elliott deserves and has our thanks for managing the symposium. She made all the arrangements for the participants and helped frame the debate. Both the debate and the book owe much of their form and substance to Martha's tireless efforts. Jack Beatty, senior editor at the Atlantic Monthly, was a superb moderator, keeping the discussion moving forward and allowing the participants to express their views in a manner that disentangled the several threads of argument. David Levine attended to the logistics at the CUNY Graduate Center, and we are grateful for his help. We are most grateful to the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania for providing the grant that supported the symposium as well as this book, and our thanks go to Kathleen Hall Jamieson of the Center. Without that support neither the public discussion nor this book would have been possible, and we are much in her debt. Robert Tempio, assistant editor at Oxford University Press helped keep us on schedule. Finally, the authors are delighted to acknowledge the patient help and wise advice from the very beginning given by our editor at Oxford University Press, Tim Bartlett. We could not have asked for more patience from Tim, and thanks to his gentle prodding our written contributions in this book are far superior to what they would have been without his counsel and advice from start to finish.

-237-

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