Debating the Death Penalty: Should America Have Capital Punishment? The Experts on Both Sides Make Their Best Case

By Hugo Adam Bedau; Paul G. Cassell | Go to book overview

Index
Abbott, Jack Henry, 133
ABC television, 145, 148
abolition movement, 21–24, 25
Adams, James, 206–7, 215–16n51
African Americans/blacks, 18, 67, 121, 201–2, 222; lynching of, 22, 31, 80, 201; sentencing of, 71–72. See also racial bias
Alabama, 94, 116n107, 168, 169, 175; racial bias in, xi, 78, 84–85, 88–92, 165–66
Alday family, 1–2
Allen, Bill, 11
Alter, Jonathan, 139
Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act (1996), 13, 23
appeals/appellate courts, 5, 112n83, 130, 140, 165, 171, 173, 231; intervention by, 20–21; racial bias cases and, 82, 87, 89, 90
Appelgate, Everett, 207
Arizona, 176
Arkansas, 193–94
Armstrong, Ken, 221, 222
Ashcroft, John, viii, 45, 54, 87, 109n51, 164
Atkins v. Virginia,21, 106n28
Baal, Thomas, 1–2, 4–5, 9, 12
Bailey, William C., 38
Baldus, David, 86, 136–37, 202, 205
Banner, Stuart, 17, 22
Barnabei, Derek, 128–29
Barshay, Hyman, 61
Barzun, James, 69
Batson v. Kennedy,90, 91, 137
Beccaria, Cesare, 32, 35, 54
Bedau, Hugo Adam, 15, 186, 188, 199, 212–13, 235; on adequate counsel, 211; on deterrence, 55, 66, 73, 191, 196; on innocence, 67–68, 132, 205, 206–7, 216n51; Pojman on, 51–52, 53, 54
Benn, John, 170
Bennet, Nelson C., 176
Bentham, Jeremy, 35, 55
Berns, Walter, 199
Best Bet argument, xi, 65–67
Bethea, Rainey, 18
Black, Charles, Jr., 29, 66, 67
Black, Hugo, 174
Blackmun, Harry A., 7, 100n2, 115n97, 154, 231, 232
Blecker, David, 150
Blinken, Anthony, 125
Bonin, William, 13
Brennan, William J., Jr., 7
Breyer, Stephen G., 10
Bright, Stephen B., 44, 70, 126, 127, 152, 186, 235; on legal representation, 209, 210, 211; on racial bias, 22, 203, 204, 230; on Southern justice, 22, 29, 192
Briley, Linwood, 11
Brisbon, Henry, 147
Brown, Pat, 221, 224
Bundy, Ted, 56, 58
Burdine, Calvin, 170–71
Caffey, Fedell, 147
California, 7–8, 177
Camus, Albert, 97–98
Canada, 156, 162, 199, 200
Cannon, Joe Frank, 170–71

-238-

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