Social Security and Its Discontents: Perspectives on Choice

By Michael D. Tanner | Go to book overview

Notes
1
2003 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance and Disability Insurance Trust Funds, p. 51, ftp://ftp.ssa.gov/pub/OACT/ TR/TR03/tr03.pdf.
2
According to the Clinton administration's fiscal year 2000 budget: “These [Trust Fund] balances are available to finance future benefit payments and other Trust Fund expenditures—but only in a bookkeeping sense…. They do not consist of real economic assets that can be drawn down in the future to fund benefits. Instead, they are claims on the Treasury that, when redeemed, will have to be financed by raising taxes, borrowing from the public, or reducing benefits or other expenditures. The existence of large Trust Fund balances, therefore, does not, by itself have any impact on the Government's ability to pay benefits.” Executive Office of the President of the United States, Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 2000, Analytic Perspectives, p. 337.
3
For example, the U.S. Supreme Court concluded in Flemming v. Nestor, 363 U.S. 603, 610–11 (1960), “To engraft upon the Social Security system a concept of ‘accrued property rights’ would deprive it of the flexibility and boldness in adjustment to ever-changing conditions which it demands.”
4
A large and permanent tax increase would bring Social Security's finances into balance. Former Cato Institute Social Security analyst Andrew Biggs calculates the tax increases necessary to keep Social Security solvent: “To achieve permanent solvency under traditional Social Security financing would demand an immediate tax increase equal to 4.47 percent of payroll: 0.67 percent to redeem the trust fund's bonds from 2018 through 2042, 1.92 percent to maintain solvency from 2042 through 2075, and 1.88 percent to achieve permanent solvency thereafter.” Andrew Biggs, “Failing by a Wide Margin: Methods and Findings in the 2003 Social Security Trustees Report,” Cato Institute Briefing Paper no. 82, April 22, 2003, p. 2.
5
The Social Security Administration interprets this rule somewhat differently, stating that the lower-earning spouse receives her earned benefit, and if it is less than 50 percent of her husband's earned benefit, she also receives the difference between the two.
6
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, “Employment Status of the Civilian Population by Sex and Age, Historical Data,” table A.1, “Women 20 Years and Over Participating in the Civilian Labor Force,” http:/data.bls.gov/servlet/ SurveyOutputServlet.
7
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, “Employment Characteristics of Families in 2002,” July 2003, http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/ famee.pdf. The 2001 and 2002 estimates are based on data from U.S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Survey. The information relates to the labor force participation of persons 16 years and older in the civilian noninstitutional population.
8
U.S. Bureau of the Census, “Fertility of American Women,” Current Population Survey, Series P20-526, June 1998, table G, http:/www.census.gov/prod/2000pubs/ p20-526.pdf. In the 1998 survey, there were 28,344 married couples, 14,316 of which had one or more children. In the 1976 survey, there were 25,420 married couples, 8,331 of which had one or more children.
9
U.S. Bureau of the Census, “Fertility of American Women,” Current Population Survey, Series P20-526, June 1998, table F, http://www.census.gov/prod/2000pubs/ p20-526.pdf.

-128-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Security and Its Discontents: Perspectives on Choice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.