Who Rules the Net? Internet Governance and Jurisdiction

By Adam Thierer; Clyde Wayne Crews Jr. | Go to book overview

Contributors

Donald J. Boudreaux

Donald J. Boudreaux is chairman of the Department of Economics at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Previously, he was president of the Foundation for Economic Education; associate professor of legal studies and economics at Clemson University; and assistant professor of economics at George Mason University. In 1996 Professor Boudreaux was a John M. Olin Visiting Fellow in Law and Economics at the Cornell Law School. He has lectured internationally on the role of markets, the nature of law, antitrust, law and economics, and international trade. His writing has appeared in publications such as the Wall Street Journal, Investor's Business Daily, Regulation, Reason, the Washington Times, Cato Journal, and the Supreme Court Economic Review.


Dan L. Burk

Dan Burk is the Oppenheimer, Wolff and Donnelly Professor of Law at the University of Minnesota, where he teaches courses in patent law, copyright, and biotechnology law. An internationally prominent authority on issues related to high technology, he is the author of numerous papers on the legal and societal impact of new technologies, including scientific misconduct, the regulation of biotechnology, and the intellectual property implications of global computer networks. Professor Burk has served as policy adviser on matters of technology to a variety of private, governmental, and intergovernmental organizations.


Fred H. Cate

Fred Cate is a distinguished professor at the Indiana University School of Law—Bloomington and director of the University's Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research. He also serves as a senior policy adviser to the Hunton and Williams Center for Information Policy

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