Copy Fights: The Future of Intellectual Property in the Information Age

By Adam Thierer; Wayne Crews | Go to book overview

3
Intellectual Property, Information Age
John Perry Barlow

Since the Telecommunications Reform Act of 1996, we have seen an extraordinary concentration of capital and access control and ownership of what they call “content” in the hands of a very few organizations. That process is continuing at a truly stunning rate. Five large institutions now control most of the world's entertainment and much of its scientific and technical intellectual property. They control broadcast media. They control cable networks. They control book and magazine publishers. They control Internet networks, and are moving rapidly to consolidate and extend that control on a global basis.

I'm not suggesting the answer is regulation. I try to stick to my beliefs. On the other hand, what we are doing with laws like the Digital Millennium Copyright Act is to give these media megaliths even more powerful tools for consolidation. The only real comparison I know is the control of information exercised by the Soviets. You may think that's hysterical, but totalitarianism works by creating a reality distortion field, self-iterating by the people themselves. Eventually it reaches a point where the people are no longer able to think anything that is not being put through the controlled media.

We've already reached a point where most of the policy that is made—not only in Washington but in most other capitals—is based on a map of the world that is created in Atlanta, Georgia. I do some consulting for the Central Intelligence Agency, which only recently discovered the information revolution. The last time I was in the headquarters building, I was taken through what you might call the nerve center of the U.S. intelligence community. There are five large screens on the wall; four of them were showing CNN, one was showing static. I'm not kidding. I don't think it was for my benefit.

How is it that we are willing to empower organizations with such authority over the ownership of ideas? If we're going to enter into

-37-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Copy Fights: The Future of Intellectual Property in the Information Age
Table of contents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 295

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.