SUBJECT INDEX
Acceptance, rules of, 85–93
Action: stands for something else, 18–21, 26–28, 33, 62 (see also Symbolic utility); utility of, 27, 54–56, 133; without motive, 190n.14
Adequacy conditions, 170
Admissible belief, 85–93
Aggravator, 73
Alertness, 145, 174
Alternative hypotheses, 85–87, 97, 162, 168, 172–174
Analogy, 168–170
Anarchy, State, and Utopia(Nozick), 8n, 32, 34n, 192n.7, 216n.53
Anthropology, 30, 32–33, 153–154
Antidrug laws, 27
A priori knowledge, 109–112
Artificial intelligence, 75–77
Assumptions, 98–100, 108–112, 120–124, 167–168, 205n.32
Asymmetry, 168
Auctions, 55n
Baldwin effect, 109, 122, 123
Bayesianism, 46, 69, 70, 81–84, 101, 121– 123, 159–162; radical, 94–100
Bayes' Theorem, 81–82; causalized, 81–84
Belief, 93–100, 147, 208n.17; conformity in, 129, 178–179; contextualism, 96–100; degrees of, 94–100, 160–161; ethics of, xiv, 69–71, 86–87; interpretation of, 152–159. See also Rational belief; True beliefs
Bias, xii–xiii, 36, 66n, 74–75, 100–106; second-level, 103–105; societal, 128–130
Book advertisement, 102n
Bucket brigade algorithm, 77
Calvinism, 46, 137
Canon, literary, xiv–xv, 105, 200n.60
Capital, intellectual, 170
Causal connection, 19, 27, 48–49, 59–62, 133
Causal decision theory, 34, 42–43, 45, 52, 60–62; and instrumental rationality, 133, 137–138
Causal importance, 60–61
Causal influence, 42
Causally expected utility, 43, 45–59, 137
Causal robustness, 61
Certainty effect, 34–35
CEU. See Causally expected utility
Chance, 83
Charity, principle of, 153–159, 216n.61
Children, 127n
Cognitive goals, 65, 67–71, 77, 149; structure of, 69. See also Explanatory power; Simplicity; Truth
Coherence, 148–150
Commitment, 21–22
Common knowledge, 52, 54n, 58, 191n.24
Compromise, 36–37, 156
Conceptual schemes, xiii, 154–156
Conditionalization, 159–162
Conditional probabilities, 42, 159–162
Consequentialism, 55–56
Conservativism, 129–130
Consistency, 77–78, 89–92, 153–154
Consumer Reports,102n
Contextualism, 96–100
Contracts, 9–10
Control of variables, 97, 172
Cooperation, 50–59, 179, 181
“Copernican Revolution,” 111–112, 176
Craft, 214–215n.43
Credibility value, 73, 83–93, 137, 141, 172, 173–174, 207n.1
Curve fitting, 4, 7
Decision theory, xiii, xiv, xvi, 32, 34–35, 41–63, 65, 66, 96–97, 170; and belief, 85–89, 93, 135–136; and imagination, 172–173; self-applied, 47, 106; testability of, 151–152; as theory of best action, 65. See also Bayesianism
Decision-value, xiv, 45–49, 53–59, 62–63, 65, 89, 137, 163, 175
Decision weights, 45–48, 52–53, 56
Deductive closure, 77–78, 89–92
Defeasibility, 8, 16, 142–143, 185n.26
Delta rule, 77
Deontology, 20, 62
Desires, 144–145, 148–150; and interpretation, 152–159

-219-

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The Nature of Rationality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • The Nature of Rationality *
  • I - How to Do Things with Principles 3
  • II - Decision-Value 41
  • III - Rational Belief 64
  • IV - Evolutionary Reasons 107
  • V - Instrumental Rationality and Its Limits 133
  • Notes 183
  • Subject Index 219
  • Index of Names 224
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