The Meaning of Czech History

By Tomáš G. Masaryk; René Wellek et al. | Go to book overview

Biographical Index

Anton, Karl Gottlob (1751-1818): 62, 70-72

Anton was a lawyer, historian, and ethnographer who devoted him- self to Lusatian studies. He corresponded with many Slavic scholars including Dobrovský and Pelcl. His main work is Erste Linien eines Versuches über der alten Slaven-Ursprung, Sitten, Gebräuche, Mein- ungen und Kenntnisse (I, 1783; II, 1789).

Bach, Alexander (1813-84): 96

Bach was an Austrian lawyer and statesman. He was responsible for bureaucratic and social reforms during Emperor Franz Joseph's reign. At first a political liberal, Bach later became a conservative when he was appointed to Prince Schwarzenberg's cabinet as minister of justice (1848-49) and then as minister of the interior (1849-59). He was re- moved from the cabinet in 1859 as a result of mounting discontent on the part of the populace.

Barák, Josef (1833-83): 120, 144

Barák was a Czech writer, translator, publicist, and newspaper editor. He was very active in arousing nationalist feelings among his people and was imprisoned on several occasions. He published the democratic weekly Svoboda (Freedom) from 1867 to 1873; he was editor-in-chief of Národní listy (The National Paper) from 1874 until his death.

Batyushkov, Konstantin Nikolayevich (1787-1855): 50

Batyushkov, a leading Russian poet of the early nineteenth century, was one of Pushkin's precursors.

Bayer, Gottlieb Siegfried (1694-1738): 43

Bayer, a German scholar, obtained the chair of eastern antiquities

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