Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam

By Bernard Edelman | Go to book overview

1

"Cherries":
First Impressions

We came 10,000 miles, almost 3 million of us, to fight America's longest war. When we arrived—on the beach at Da Nang, at the bustling air terminal of Tan Son Nhut, in the baking heat of Cam Ranh Bay—we were trim and eager, jaunty and scared But mostly, we were young. White and Black, Hispanic and Native American, Guamian and Hawaiian, the majority of us were not yet out of our teens. "Cherries" we were called, and "Newbies" and "FNGs"— "Fuckin' New Guys "-by troops hardened and made less sanguine, perhaps, by just a few months in the bush. Like them, we would age —bust our cherries—quickly.

During the rapid build-up of American forces in the wake of the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin resolution, entire units were shipped to Vietnam. Some were greeted by "friendlies" bearing wreathes of Rowers, others by sniper fire. Later, though, most of us cherries were sent as replacements, to be assigned individually to units after arriving in country. Once assigned, we plunged into the routines of our jobs, slogging through jungles and rice paddies; skying over land cratered and defoliated, lush and green, in helicopters and jet fighters and bombers; saving lives of the traumatically injured in evacuation hospitals; cooking and clerking, writing reports and clearing land from the Delta to the DMZ.

We soon found ourselves caught up, as Lieutenant Robert Salerni put it, "in a war of contrasts in a land of contrasts, " where few things were as they seemed The Vietnamese were at once friendly and deceptive, alluring and treacherous. The weather was

____________________
Photograph by Larry Burrows © Larry Burrows Collection

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Dear America - Letters Home from Vietnam *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword *
  • Preface *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • Dear America *
  • 1 - "Cherries"- First Impressions *
  • 2 - "Humping the Boonies" *
  • 3 - Beyond the Body Count *
  • 4 - Base Camp- War at the Rear *
  • 5 - "World of Hurt" *
  • 6 - What Am I Doing Here? *
  • 7 - "We Gotta Get out of This Place" *
  • 8 - Last Letters *
  • Epilogue *
  • Glossary *
  • A Note about the Memorial *
  • Index of Contributors *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.