SOME JAPANESE TERMS

BAKUFU: The central administration of Japan under a Shogun.

DAIMYO: A feudal lord of the Tokugawa period whose domain was estimated to yield an annual crop equivalent to 10,000 koku of rice or more. FUDAI DAIMYO were hereditary vassals of the Tokugawa. TOZAMA DAIMYO were those who were subject to the Shogun's control only by virtue of the authority which the Shogun derived from the Emperor.

KAMPAKU: The senior minister at the Imperial Court before 1868.

KAN (KWAN): Measure of weight. 1 kan =8·27 lbs.

KOKU: Measure of capacity. 1 koku =4.96 bushels.

ROJU: A feudal lord (specifically, a fudai daimyo) who was a member of the Shogun's Council of State in the Tokugawa period.

RYO: Gold coin of the Tokugawa period. Before 1850, approximately equivalent in value to 1 koku of rice.

SAMURAI: A member of Japan's feudal ruling class before 1871. Technically the term included the Shogun and the daimyo, but it was more often used of those below this rank.

SHOGUN: The Emperor's military deputy. Before 1868 the office was in effect that of an hereditary de facto monarch.

YEN (Y): Monetary unit of modern Japan. Until 1934 it exchanged at about 10 to the pound sterling; from 1934 to 1939 at about 17; since 1950 at about 1,000.

ZAIBATSU: 'Financial clique', or plutocracy. Term used to describe a handful of great family holding companies in modern Japan, distinguished by their enormous size and the wide spread of their economic interests.

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