With the Stroke of a Pen: Executive Orders and Presidential Power

By Kenneth R. Mayer | Go to book overview

Three
Patterns of Use

ANY COMPREHENSIVE understanding of executive orders as a class of presidential decision requires some basic descriptive work: How many orders have presidents issued? Are there any consistent patterns with respect to the subject matter of orders? Does the frequency of orders vary with a president's political situation? To understand how presidents have used executive orders as an instrument of executive power, it is necessary to place orders into categories and analyze the external forces that spur their issuance. This chapter attempts to discern patterns in how presidents have used executive orders over time.


Tracking Executive Orders

The complexity of the process surrounding Executive Order 12114, described in chapter two, belies the notion that executive orders typically involve routine administrative matters with few substantive consequences. But the complex administrative procedures that govern the drafting and clearance of modern executive orders stand in sharp contrast to the informal methods that were used to keep track of them before 1935. Until the format and publication of executive orders were standardized in the 1920s and 1930s (in a series of presidential instructions that themselves took the form of executive orders), it was often unclear which presidential actions, exactly, constituted an executive order. Presidents have issued executive directives and commands from the earliest days of the Republic, but there has never been a uniform style. As a result, executive orders were issued and recorded in a haphazard manner:

Often a President would write “Approved,” “Let it be done,” or “I approve the accompanying recommendation and order that it be effected,” or similar words at the end of a recommendation drawn up by a Cabinet member. Sometimes an Executive order was signed by a secretary at the order of the President…. Other orders were signed by the Secretary of State in the absence of both the President and the Vice President…. Others were orders signed by department heads, and they purported to have the same effect as if they had been signed by the President…. Executive Order 396 [of 1906] is not even

-66-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
With the Stroke of a Pen: Executive Orders and Presidential Power
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 293

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.