Masons, Tricksters and Cartographers: Comparative Studies in the Sociology of Scientific and Indigenous Knowledge

By David Turnbull | Go to book overview
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Figures
1. Kivas and roads of the Chaco region 22
2. Hopi horizon calendar 24
3. Inca capital Cuzco with ceques imposed 28
4. Incan quipu 29
5. Quipu master 30
6. Central desert Aborigines showing the anthropologist Donald Thompson a map of watering holes on a spear thrower in 1957 33
7. Aboriginal spatial knowledge as the joint articulation of genealogical and narrative patterning 36
8. The messiness of Chartres 58
9. ‘Work of many men’ 59
10. Master mason and client talking 64
11. The use of geometry and string 70
12. Contemporary templates in use 72
13. Thirteenth century sketch of templates 73
14. ‘Fool’s Cap’ Map 90
15. Louis XVI giving instructions to La Perouse 96
16. Late fifteenth century local estate map, Inclesmoor, Yorkshire 102
17. A portolan chart, Cantino Planisphere, 1502 106
18. Diogo Ribeiro’s Planisphere 1529 108
19. A section of a ‘Dieppe’ World Map showing Java La Grande 111
20. Cassini’s Planisphere Terrestre 1696 115
21. Triangulation of France 116
22. The ‘Plan of the Triangles’ 118
23. The Geeenwich and Paris observatories 120
24. ‘Tupaia’s Chart’ 123
25. Star compass 137
26. Etak according to Hutchins 138
27. Chronology of Pacific Occupation 141
28. ‘Against the Wind’ 143
29. Pulatan canoe 149
30. ‘Teaching the Star Compass’ 154
31. ‘Breadfruit Picker Lashing’ and ‘Island Seeing’ exercise 155
32. Life cycle of malarial parasite 164

-vii-

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