The Origins of the First World War

By Ruth Henig | Go to book overview

Index

a
Afghanistan 13
Africa
European attitudes 56
imperialism 3-4 , 6 , 39
Albania
established to contain Serbia 22
Albertini, Luigi
The Origins of the War of 191444
Alsace and Lorraine
boosts German economy 9
French bitterness 1 , 3
issue fades 54-5
Armaments and the Coming of War (Stevenson) 41 , 50
The Arming of Europe and the Making of the First World War (Herrman) 41
Asia
European attitudes 56
imperialism 3-4 , 39
Austria-Hungary
assassination of Franz Ferdinand 23
blames Serbia for assassination 24
causes of war 37 , 41
conflict with Russia over Turkey 4-5
declares war on Serbia 28
decline of military power 49
domestic problems 54 , 55
German support 35
Grey attempts mediation 27-8
League of the Three Emperors 4
‘Mediterranean agreement’ 6-7
mobilization and ultimatum 24-7
multinational empire 17-18
‘pig war’ with Serbia 19-20
power blocs 52-3
pre-war conflicts with Serbia 19-23 , 42-3
pre-war tranquillity 1
refuses Russian ships 18
Russian mobilization against 28-30
takes control of Bosnia and Hercegovina 19 , 20
Triple Alliance 6-7
and Turkey 2
unhappy national minorities 42-3

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Origins of the First World War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction - To the Third Edition xi
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • Timeline of Key Events xix
  • 1 - The Origins of War 1
  • 2 - The Historical Debate 33
  • Annotated Select Bibliography 60
  • Index 63
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 76

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.