Sociolinguistics: A Resource Book for Students

By Peter Stockwell | Go to book overview
Save to active project

D

EXTENSION

SOCIOLINGUISTIC READINGS

D1

HOW TO USE THE READINGS
Throughout this book I have been at pains to emphasise the importance of reading in the area of sociolinguistics. Extensive reading of books and articles has several benefits:
it provides you with the necessary background of the history of the discipline;
it familiarises you with the main current research areas;
it allows you to see the sorts of methods and approaches that are used by different sociolinguists;
it gives you a model for how to express yourself in appropriate academic and scholarly language.

Reading with a critical awareness (that is, reading and thinking rather than simply being a passive reader) allows you to see that different writers come to different conclusions and interpretations. This sort of critical engagement will spark your own ideas and allow you to see areas that need further investigation. The journey from being introduced to sociolinguistics to being a serious researcher doing valuable and innovative work is a short one, and by this point in the book you are already well on the way.

The ten readings in this section have been selected to give you a useful resource across the field of sociolinguistics. They range from surveys to specific details of research studies; they include classic articles as well as extracts that are more difficult to find; and they cover material which is accessible as well as writing that can give you a taste of complex analysis and argument. After each reading, some suggestions for thinking and critical engagement are offered. It is often useful if you make brief notes and ideas either in the margins (if this book is yours) or in a notebook. If you get into the habit of ‘reading with a pencil’ you will find you are never short of ideas.

The numbered sections roughly correspond with the corresponding sections earlier in this book, though sometimes the readings combine several areas of interest. The first reading, below, uses many of the terms introduced in A1, though Hamer also discusses issues of standardisation (A6, B6, C6) in relation to language change (B11, C11), and refers to Labov’s work (A5) in order to make a point about language and education (B12, C12).

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sociolinguistics: A Resource Book for Students
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.