Woman at Work the Autobiography of Mary Anderson, as Told to Mary N. Winslow

By Mary Anderson; Mary N. Winslow | Go to book overview

Woman at Work

The autobiography of MARY ANDERSON as told to MARY N. WINSLOW

Minneapolis 1951

THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA PRESS

LONDON · GEOFFREY CUMBERLEGE · OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

-iii-

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Woman at Work the Autobiography of Mary Anderson, as Told to Mary N. Winslow
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Table of Contents xi
  • 1 - From the Old World to the New 3
  • 2 - A Casual Worker in the Promised Land 13
  • 3 - The Young Trade Unionist 20
  • 4 - Women's Trade Union League 32
  • 5 - Arbitration and Negotiation 42
  • 6 - The Organizer at Work 50
  • 7 - Women in Trade Unions 61
  • 8 - Working for Legislation 71
  • 9 - New Channels of Work 79
  • 10 - Women in Ordnance 88
  • 11 - The Woman in Industry Service 94
  • 12 - Women Workers in World War I 102
  • 13 - The Women's Bureau is Established 108
  • 14 - Paris 1919 116
  • 15 - International Congresses of Working Women 125
  • 16 - Activities of the Bureau 134
  • 17 - Equal Pay for Women 142
  • 18 - Discriminations Against Women 151
  • 19 - The So-Called Equal Rights Amendment 159
  • 20 - Presidents and Secretaries of Labor 173
  • 21 - Personnel Problems 186
  • 22 - Ventures in International Relations 193
  • 23 - Cooperation: Failures and Successes 205
  • 24 - New Quarters and New Friends 215
  • 25 - The Bryn Mawr Summer School 222
  • 26 - Home Life in Washington 230
  • 27 - Irons in the Fire 236
  • 28 - Women Workers in World War II 246
  • 29 - Honors and Retirement 255
  • Index 260
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