Agriculture and Economic Development in East Asia: From Growth to Protectionism in Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

By Penelope Francks; Johanna Boestel et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

The idea for the research project on which this book is based arose out of puzzlement at the lack of attention given, in the voluminous literature on the East Asian success story, to the part that might have been played in the process by the region’s farmers. Coming from a background in Development Economics, and many years of work on Japan’s agricultural development, to teaching courses on the ‘East Asian miracle’, it seemed to me particularly strange that the ‘East Asian model’ is almost unique amongst development models in prescribing no apparent role for agriculture. The opportunity to investigate the extent to which this neglect was justified was, however, to be provided as a result of funding under the Economic and Social Research Council’s Pacific Asia Programme, and the project which was set up on this basis was designed to bring together the material, in English and in East Asian languages, which would make possible a comparative study of agriculture’s role over time in the economies of the three now-industrial East Asian economies with significant agricultural sectors.

A substantial part of the results of our work concerns the contribution which the agricultural sectors of Japan, Korea and Taiwan made, during the ‘miracle’ development of the three economies, to the speed and character of industrialisation and to the avoidance of many of the problems of rural poverty and inequality which other developing countries have faced. At the time of writing, however, a number of Asia Pacific nations, and Korea and Japan in particular, are facing economic crises arising, in the long run, from the difficulty of adapting the institutions and policy approaches which lay behind miracle industrialisation to the new realities of the ‘globalised’, ‘post-industrial’ world. In all three countries, agriculture represents a central, and politically highly sensitive, example of the conflict and trauma which this process involves, as the region’s farmers and their representatives battle to sustain rural society in the face of the forces of ‘internationalisation’. Japan, Korea and Taiwan will not be the last of the Asia Pacific countries to struggle with the ‘agricultural adjustment problem’ to which many Western

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Agriculture and Economic Development in East Asia: From Growth to Protectionism in Japan, Korea, and Taiwan
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.