Practitioner-Based Enquiry: Principles for Postgraduate Research

By Louis Murray; Brenda Lawrence | Go to book overview

3

Opening the Tool Bag

Proactive Behaviour in Planning an Enquiry

Preparation and Planning

Systematic planning and preparation beforehand, are the essence of ‘strategy’ for the conduct of practitioner-based enquiries. Some enquiries and information-gathering activities are likely to be straightforward. Others, probably the majority, are likely to be complex and full of hidden, potential pitfalls. Where difficulties are likely to occur, the prior planning task is even more important. Entering into any kind of enquiry involving people and systems is necessarily a complex and sensitive task. To study effectively real-life settings, the researcher has to be a practising sociologist and also an inquisitive citizen. More urgently, the researcher must have or acquire the technical competences that are part of the ‘tool bag’ of the applied researcher.

The very first move in planning a PBE is an in-depth consideration of the topic area. Ideas tend to be rather general at first. They have to be further scrutinized in respect of such questions as: Why research this topic? What knowledge will be gained? Will the enquiry lead towards improved skills? This in-depth consideration may range from empowering self to practical, professional benefits in the workplace leading to organizational change and improved management. From the outset, the practitioner must not only ‘know’ his or her purpose and who or what it is for, but must also keep it clearly in view throughout the life of the enquiry. A good sense of audience and an expectation, even at this early stage, of what the results of the enquiry are likely to be is helpful. In taking such a step, the process of focusing the general ideas commences. Sometimes, the way ahead may be self-evident or, on the other hand, confused and opaque. Matters may be shaped by whether you are deciding for yourself or whether outside agencies are influencing the purpose. A brief from a line manager is one such well-known external influence on the selection of research problems. Ideally, the drive towards focus should be impelled by what you as researcher are interested in and care about. If you are not strongly motivated about a topic, the whole exercise tends to become much harder and can slide into drudgery. Similarly, prior enquiry and research experiences can be re-engaged to drive towards

-42-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Practitioner-Based Enquiry: Principles for Postgraduate Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Series Editor’s Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - What Is Practitioner-Based Enquiry? 4
  • 2 - The Basis of Critique of Practitioner-Based Enquiry 18
  • 3 - Opening the Tool Bag 42
  • 4 - ’Ologies and Analogies 70
  • 5 - Contriving Methodology 123
  • 6 - Analysing and Writing— Writing and Analysing 161
  • 7 - Making a Difference 196
  • Appendix 1 217
  • Appendix 2 219
  • Appendix 3 224
  • Appendix 4 225
  • References 230
  • Index 236
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 242

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.