Practitioner-Based Enquiry: Principles for Postgraduate Research

By Louis Murray; Brenda Lawrence | Go to book overview

7

Making a Difference

Using PBE to Influence Policy and Practice

In this concluding chapter we draw upon and present some purpose statements of actual PBE work to illustrate how the stable predisposition of tutor as enquirer may actively connect with the real world concerns of education and training. Similarly, these extracts may be taken as indicators of how the assumptions of PBE are made visible and, through their reception and use in the public domain, tested for admissibility. It is here where the meaning of ‘applications’ and ‘implications for policy’ becomes clearer. The diversity and range in the educational and training settings that are the sites for these examples helps to make visible the institutional character of the issues under enquiry. PBE is, as emphasized in earlier chapters, system-based and often system-derived. In speaking of the implications of PBE for wider educational practices and policies, even if they are local ones, reference is made therefore as to how institutions might respond to the pressing issues of the day. These are usually two-dimensional: they have a specific and current character that may be defined by government policy or pressing operational requirement. They also in some way illuminate the more abstract developments and cultural changes in the society in which they are located.

Consider PBE Exhibit A, a set of research questions on a highly topical and controversial aspect of police operational practice and the training for that operational practice in a county police force in the south of England:

PBE Exhibit A: Child protection practices in a county constabulary
1 What is the current child protection practice in Midshires constabulary?
2 How do police managers view their role within child protection practice?

-196-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Practitioner-Based Enquiry: Principles for Postgraduate Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Series Editor’s Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - What Is Practitioner-Based Enquiry? 4
  • 2 - The Basis of Critique of Practitioner-Based Enquiry 18
  • 3 - Opening the Tool Bag 42
  • 4 - ’Ologies and Analogies 70
  • 5 - Contriving Methodology 123
  • 6 - Analysing and Writing— Writing and Analysing 161
  • 7 - Making a Difference 196
  • Appendix 1 217
  • Appendix 2 219
  • Appendix 3 224
  • Appendix 4 225
  • References 230
  • Index 236
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 242

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.