Origins of the Cold War: An International History

By Melvyn P. Leffler; David S. Painter | Go to book overview

NOTES

From Melvyn P. Leffler, “The American Conception of National Security and the Beginnings of the Cold War, 1945-48,” The American Historical Review, 89 (April 1984): 346-81. Reprinted and abridged by permission of the author.

1
Henry Kissinger, For the Record: Selected Statements, 1977-80 (Boston, MA, 1980), 123-4.
2
For recent overviews of the origins of the Cold War, which seek to go beyond the heated traditionalist-revisionist controversies of the 1960s and early 1970s, see, for example, John L. Gaddis, The United States and the Origins of the Cold War, 1941-1947 (New York, 1972); Daniel Yergin, Shattered Peace: The Origins of the Cold War and the National Security State (Boston, MA, 1978); Thomas G. Paterson, On Every Front: The Making of the Cold War (New York, 1979); and Roy Douglas, From War to Cold War, 1942-48 (New York, 1981).
3
For some of the most important and most recent regional and bilateral studies, see, for example, Bruce Kuniholm, The Origins of the Cold War in the Near East: Great Power Conflict and Diplomacy in Iran. Turkey, and Greece (Princeton, NJ 1980); Lawrence S. Wittner, American Intervention in Greece (New York, 1982); Aaron Miller, Search for Security: Saudi Arabian Oil and American Foreign Policy, 1939-1949 (Chapel Hill, NC, 1980); Timothy Ireland, Creating the Entangling Alliance: The Origins of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (Westport, CT, 1981); William W. Stueck, Jr, The Road to Confrontation: American Policy toward China and Korea (Chapel Hill, NC, 1981); Dorothy Borg and Waldo Heinrichs (eds), Uncertain Years: Chinese-American Relations, 1947-1950 (New York, 1980); Robert J. McMahon, Colonialism and the Cold War: The United States and the Struggle for Indonesian Independence, 1945-49 (Ithaca, NY, 1981); Bruce Cumings, The Origins of the Korean War: Liberation and the Emergence of Separate Regimes, 1945-47 (Princeton, NJ, 1982); Geir Lundestad, America, Scandinavia and the Cold War, 1945-49 (New York, 1980); Kenneth Ray Bain, March to Zion: United States Foreign Policy and the Founding of Israel (College Station, TX, 1979); Robert M. Hathaway, Ambiguous Partnership: Britain and America, 1944-47 (New York, 1981); Eduard Mark, “American Policy toward Eastern Europe and the Origins of the Cold War, 1941-46: An Alternative Interpretation,” Journal of American History [hereafter JAH], 68 (1981-2): 313-36; Michael Schaller, “Securing the Great Crescent: Occupied Japan and the Origins of Containment in Southeast Asia.” JAH, 69 (1982-3): 392-414; and Michael J. Hogan, “The Search for a ‘Creative Peace’: The United States, European Unity, and the Origins of the Marshall Plan,” Diplomatic History, 6 (Summer 1982): 267-85.
4
For recent works on strategy, the national military establishment, and the emergence of the national security bureaucracy, see, for example, Richard Haynes, The Awesome Power: Harry S. Truman as

-40-

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