4
Haves" and "Have Nots

We will not deal effectively with hunger through private acts of charity alone. It is possible for us to feed a hungry family or two -- an action not to be despised -- without disturbing the conditions that brought about their hunger. In order to make lasting gains against hunger, the concern from which charity flows must also give rise to justice.

Put another way, we should care enough about hungry people to ask why they are hungry. And if we ask that question, the answer is as simple as it is complex: People are hungry because they are poor. We cannot come to terms with hunger unless we deal with poverty. And we cannot understand poverty apart from a rapidly growing gap between the haves and the have nots of the world.


Their Poverty and Ours

Poverty in most countries defies the imagination. Peter Drucker has said:

What impresses the outside world about the United States today is not how our rich men live -- the world has seen riches before, and on a larger and more ostentatious scale. What impresses the outside world is how the poor of this country live. "Up to Poverty" is the proper slogan....1

Drucker has a point. Where in our own cities do you see -- as you can in India -- people carrying buckets of water from or bathing at public water taps, emaciated cattle wandering in the streets,

-39-

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Bread for the World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vi
  • Preface ix
  • Part I - The Struggle for Bread 1
  • 1 - Hunger 3
  • 2 - Food Production 14
  • 3 - Population 27
  • Part II - Bread and Justice 37
  • 4 - Haves" and "Have Nots 39
  • 5 - Environment, Resources and Growth 47
  • 6 - Up from Hunger 58
  • Part III - The Need for a U.S. Commitment on Hunger 71
  • 7 - The Rediscovery of America 73
  • 8 - Hunger Usa 82
  • 9 - Trade: a Hunger Issue 90
  • 10 - The Role Of Investment Abroad 102
  • 11 - Foreign Aid: A Case for Reform 110
  • 12 - Let Them Eat Missiles 122
  • Part IV - A Program for Action 131
  • 13 - A Citizens' Movement 133
  • 14 - What Can I Do? 143
  • The Right to Food - A Statement of Policy (provisional Draft) By Bread for the World 165
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