14
What Can I Do?

In the PBS network documentary, "World Hunger -- Who Will Survive?", narrator Bill Moyers tells of a friend who, upon learning that the documentary is in process, said, "Bloated bodies! Bloated bodies! Don't show us any more bloated bodies. I know they are there, but what can I do about it?"

What can I do?

The question is often rhetorical, with the answer implied: "Nothing." Because that expresses the feelings of so many, you may first need to advise yourself that ordinary people can do something about hunger. Each person has special abilities that are needed. Not to use them is to bury your talent, as did the servant in the parable. To use them is to offer yourself to God and reach out to others. Though individual efforts may be difficult or impossible to measure, they make a difference. They are like the little ripples that in combination add up to big waves.

Second, don't get discouraged. If you throw yourself into the cause with great enthusiasm but give up when you encounter obstacles or when the newness wears off, you won't help much. But if you can stick to the methodical monotonous tasks that have to be done, you can be a mover. Start small, if necessary, but stick to it.

Third, begin now. If you wait for a better time to come along, it probably won't. So start on some things you can begin to do at once. One step leads to another.

Below are lists of things that individuals and groups can do. The lists are sketchy. You can make your own improvements. The suggestions are not all easy, but they are within reach.

-143-

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Bread for the World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vi
  • Preface ix
  • Part I - The Struggle for Bread 1
  • 1 - Hunger 3
  • 2 - Food Production 14
  • 3 - Population 27
  • Part II - Bread and Justice 37
  • 4 - Haves" and "Have Nots 39
  • 5 - Environment, Resources and Growth 47
  • 6 - Up from Hunger 58
  • Part III - The Need for a U.S. Commitment on Hunger 71
  • 7 - The Rediscovery of America 73
  • 8 - Hunger Usa 82
  • 9 - Trade: a Hunger Issue 90
  • 10 - The Role Of Investment Abroad 102
  • 11 - Foreign Aid: A Case for Reform 110
  • 12 - Let Them Eat Missiles 122
  • Part IV - A Program for Action 131
  • 13 - A Citizens' Movement 133
  • 14 - What Can I Do? 143
  • The Right to Food - A Statement of Policy (provisional Draft) By Bread for the World 165
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