The First Christians in Their Social Worlds: Social-Scientific Approaches to New Testament Interpretation

By Philip F. Esler | Go to book overview

Chapter 6

Millennialism and Daniel 7

THE TRADITION OF THE FOURTH BEAST

At the start of Daniel 7 the seer recounts a night vision he had of four beasts which rose from the depths of the Great Sea. The first beast was like a lion and had eagle’s wings, the second was like a bear, and the third like a leopard with four birds’ wings and four heads. The fourth beast, however, was worse than any of these. It was ‘fearsome and grisly and exceedingly strong, with great iron teeth. It devoured and crunched, and it trampled underfoot what was left. It was different from all the beasts which went before it, and had ten horns’ (7.7; REB). As the seer was considering the horns, another horn, a small one, appeared among the others and three of the original horns were uprooted to make way for it. ‘In this horn were eyes like human eyes and a mouth that uttered bombast’ (7.8; REB). As the seer looks on, the heavenly court abruptly appears and the beast is killed and its carcass consigned to the flames (7.9-12). There follows the celebrated description of the arrival of one like a human being (literally ‘like a son of man’—kevar enosh in the Aramaic), to whom are given sovereignty and glory and kingly power (7.13-14).

Troubled and dismayed, Daniel seeks guidance as to the meaning of what he has seen from one of those present. He is told: ‘These great beasts, four in number, are four kingdoms which will arise from the earth. But the holy ones of the Most High will receive the kingly power and retain possession of it always, for ever and ever’ (7.17-18). Daniel then seeks a more detailed explanation, since he sees the horn waging war against ‘the holy ones’ with some success, until the arrival of the Ancient in Years and the award of judgement in their favour, together with kingly power. His heavenly informant then obliges him with a long

-92-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The First Christians in Their Social Worlds: Social-Scientific Approaches to New Testament Interpretation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 164

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.