Chapter 7

2 Thessalonians 3: Exhortation and letter-closing—the disorderly brothers and sisters

3.1-5: EXHORTATIONS AND PRAYER

The opening section of the third and final part of 2 Thessalonians is made up of loosely connected sentences. Still, there is a certain logic in the passage, as we saw above when we analysed the letter’s structure, and as will be explained further below. ‘Paul’ here reinforces his bonds with the addressees, not only by using again the vocative ‘brothers and sisters’, but also and especially by asking them to pray for him and his companions and by praising their faith (3.1; he prayed for them in what immediately preceded); by presenting himself and his companions as their fellow sufferers from persecution (3.2, cf. 1.4); by expressing his trust that they are already doing as he says (3.4). Because of the support of the Lord (3.3, 5) and of the author’s admonitions (3.4), the addressees will be kept on the right track. Thus ‘Paul’ makes them receptive to his specific injunctions that will follow in 3.6-12.

‘Paul’ starts the passage with the words: ‘Finally, pray, brothers and sisters, for us’ (3.1) This request has been derived from 1 Thessalonians 5.25; the wording of the two appeals is only slightly different. Similar requests towards the end of a letter are found in Romans 15.30, Ephesians 6.19, and Colossians 4.3 (cf. Heb. 13.18); they emphasize the reciprocity between sender and addressees. The word ‘finally’ comes from 1 Thessalonians 4.1; it now serves to introduce the final part of the letter (cf. 2 Cor. 13.11; Gal. 6.17; Eph. 6.10; Phil. 4.8).

Unlike 1 Thessalonians 5.25, the content of the prayer is given in two clauses. The first of these reads: ‘that the word of the Lord may have a swift course and may be glorified’. ‘Paul’ asks them to pray for him in his role of apostle, as one sent to preach ‘the word

-125-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
2 Thessalonians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Editor’s Preface vi
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 2 - Thessalonians in English Translation 5
  • Part I 9
  • Chapter 1 11
  • Chapter 2 27
  • Chapter 3 44
  • Part 2 67
  • Chapter 4 69
  • Chapter 5 79
  • Chapter 6 96
  • Chapter 7 125
  • Conclusion - 2 Thessalonians and Paul 146
  • Bibliography 150
  • Index of Subjects 156
  • Index of References to Biblical and Other Ancient Literature 160
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 172

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.