The Handbook of Environmental Education

By Joy Palmer; Philip Neal | Go to book overview

Chapter 11

Assessment and evaluation
If a school policy and individual schemes of work for environmental education are to be implemented successfully, then appropriate arrangements for assessment and evaluation must be in place. Progression in the theme can only be achieved through planned programmes of study which are devised and monitored to take account of the cross-curricular nature of learning; that is, that environmental education will be included in the progressive schemes of work of other subject areas. In the case of the National Curriculum for Schools in England, this will be interpreted to mean cross-referencing with the attainment targets and statements of attainment of the core and foundation subjects. Assessment should relate to the three central teaching objectives for environmental education, i.e. knowledge and understanding, skills, and concepts. The national framework for assessment will be an essential baseline since a great deal of environmental teaching and learning will occur through teaching of the core and foundation subjects. That aside, innovatory or original school-devised methods of environmental assessment are necessary in relation to other elements, notably the development of attitudes and concern. We return to the model for teaching and learning in environmental education outlined in Part II (Figure 5.1, p. 39). This serves as a useful checklist when recalling components of environmental work which need to be assessed and evaluated. The following set of teacher-based questions arising from this model will form a basis for discussion and consideration when going about both planning and assessment tasks: A
• Have I planned tasks which help pupils to learn about the environment?
• Have I planned tasks which involve learning in or through the environment?
• Have I planned tasks which involve learning for the environment?

-152-

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The Handbook of Environmental Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Part I - Setting the Scene 1
  • Chapter 1 - Concern for the Environment 3
  • Chapter 2 - Environmental Education: International Development and Progress 11
  • Chapter 3 - Threads of a Theme: Principles and Structure 18
  • Chapter 4 - The National Curriculum 23
  • Part II - Environmental Education in Schools 35
  • Chapter 5 - Planning and Practice at the Primary Level 37
  • Chapter 6 - Primary to Secondary: a Time of Transition 63
  • Chapter 7 - Planning and Practice at the Secondary Level 67
  • Chapter 8 - The Out-Of-School (Field Work) Approach 94
  • Part III - Practicalities 103
  • Chapter 9 - Developing and Coordinating a School Policy for Environmental Education 105
  • Chapter 10 - Implementing a School Policy for Environmental Education 128
  • Chapter 11 - Assessment and Evaluation 152
  • Part IV - Resources 161
  • Appendices 215
  • Appendix A 217
  • Appendix B 221
  • Appendix C 223
  • Appendix D 225
  • Appendix E 227
  • Appendix F 229
  • Appendix G 233
  • Appendix H 255
  • Appendix J 258
  • Appendix K 260
  • References 262
  • Index 264
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