Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Industry in the Landscape

By Marilyn Palmer; Peter Neaverson | Go to book overview

8

The industrial landscape: past, present and future

Images of industry

This book has been concerned with the different facets of the industrial landscape in the two centuries between 1700 and 1900. Industrial activity was widespread during this period and until the second half of the nineteenth century was integrated with, rather than superimposed on, the landscape. The attitudes of contemporaries to the vast changes that were taking place are recorded in the diaries of many travellers throughout Great Britain during the eighteenth and, more especially, the nineteenth centuries. These were mainly members of the lesser gentry, clergymen and professional people who emulated their betters on the ‘grand tour’ by exploring the sights to be seen in their own country. In the growing roman-ticism of the late eighteenth century, they viewed waterfalls, mountains and ruins but could not fail to be impressed by the increasing industrial activity they found. Some came deliberately to seek it out. These were the so-called ‘industrial spies’ from Europe, who came to discover the secrets of Britain’s early industrialisation. Their numbers included men with specialist knowledge of the metallurgical industries, like the Swedish travellers Svedenstierna, Schroderstierna and Triewald and the Frenchmen Gabriel Jars, Le Turc, Moissenet and de la Houlière. 1 Their accounts were largely factual and some, like Jars and Moissenet, made meticulous drawings of the equipment they saw. Others went so far as to smuggle out dismantled machines so that they could be copied in their home countries.

Many English travellers were equally interested in the novel processes which they witnessed, from Defoe in the early eighteenth century to semi-official reporters like Arthur Young and John Farey later on, together with romantically-minded clergymen like the Reverend Richard Warner and

-184-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Industry in the Landscape
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.