Jane Austen and Representations of Regency England

By Roger Sales | Go to book overview

Notes

1REWRITING THE REGENCY
1
Sarah Tytler, Jane Austen and Her Works (Cassell, Petter Galpin & Co., London, 1880), p. 11. For brief details of Tytler’s literary life see V. Blain et al. (eds), The Feminist Companion to Literature in English: Women Writers from the Middle Ages to the Present (Batsford, London, 1990), p. 1104.
2
Tytler, Jane Austen and Her Works, p. 201 and p. 16.
3
Patricia Meyer Spacks, ‘Female Resources: Epistles, Plot and Power’, Elizabeth C. Goldsmith (ed.), Writing the Female Voice: Essays on Epistolary Literature (Northwestern University Press, Boston, 1989), pp. 63-75.
4
Margaret Kirkham, ‘The Austen-Leighs and Jane Austen…’, Janet Todd (ed.), Jane Austen: New Perspectives (Holmes & Meier Publishers, Inc., New York, 1983), pp. 29-38. This probably remains the most valuable collection of essays on Austen. See also Margaret Kirkham, Jane Austen: Feminism and Fiction (Harvester Press, Brighton, 1983), ch. 8.
5
Jan Fergus, Jane Austen: A Literary Life (Macmillan, Basingstoke, 1991), esp. ch. 1. I deal with some of the women who wrote to attract charity in a forthcoming essay, ‘Poor Relations: Writing in the Working Class’, David Pirie (ed.), The Penguin History of English Literature: Romanticism (Penguin, London, forthcoming). For the literary market place and the woman writer before Austen see, amongst others, Cheryl Turner, Living by the Pen: Women Writers in the Eighteenth Century (Routledge, London, 1992).
6
Deborah Kaplan, ‘The Disappearance of the Woman Writer: Jane Austen and Her Biographers’, Prose Studies, 7, 1984, pp. 124-47, p. 136. On the theme of the disappearance of the woman writer, Austen-Leigh borrowed with acknowledgement a lot of his material, including the remarks about quizzing, from a manuscript written in 1867 by his sister Caroline Austen which was only published much later, My Aunt Jane Austen: A Memoir (Spottiswoode, Ballantyne & Co., London and Colchester, 1952).
7
‘Style and Miss Austen’, Macmillan’s Magazine, 51, 1884, pp. 84-91, p. 85.
8
As quoted in Countess of Ilchester and Lord Stavordale (eds), The Life and Letters of Lady Sarah Lennox 1745-1826…(John Murray, London, 1901), 2, 2, p. 292. Lady Lennox later became Lady Napier.
9
See earlier chapters of Ian Hamilton, Keepers of the Flame: Literary Estates and the Rise of Biography (Hutchinson, London, 1992), for more details.
10
Constance Hill, Jane Austen: Her Homes and Haunts…(John Lane, London, 1923 edn; 1st pub. 1901). For the inventions of Englishness in this

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