Teaching English as a Foreign Language

By Geoffrey Broughton; Christopher Brumfit et al. | Go to book overview

different semantic notions—how to persuade people to do things, how to express intentions, how to complain and so forth. These notions may be expressed in simple language or complex grammatical patterns, but linguistic factors of this type are of secondary importance. A quite different type of course like this is useful for remedial classes because of its novelty and because its functional goals are readily identified and achieved. In a notional course, particularly when used for remedial classes, there is no long slow build-up to establish a necessary grammatical base before any meaningful communication is possible, and notional teaching makes for strong motivation with its emphasis on communication in practical situations. Such visible signs of success are very valuable to motivate the remedial student. Members of remedial classes are very sensitive to failure, for obvious reasons. An understanding of this is an essential quality in their teacher, since a dismissive, condemnatory attitude will only have very negative results. Patience is another virtue greatly needed, since one’s best efforts often seem to produce nothing but the same errors yet once more. Progress is often slow. There are cases where it is almost non-existent, since some people are endowed with a great desire and willingness to learn English, but apparently limited ability to do so. It is also possible that people may have a natural languagelearning ceiling beyond which they cannot go. It is best for the teacher gently but firmly to discourage them from continuing—yet another delicate task for the remedial teacher to perform! The demands are great on teachers concerned with error correction, but there are compensatory rewards in seeing one’s charges grasp a point at last which seemed totally beyond them or in receiving their evident gratitude for one’s efforts. It is all part of the job’s satisfaction.


Suggestions for further reading

From a theoretical point of view:

S.P. Corder, Introducing Applied Linguistics, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1973, chapter II.
S.P. Corder, ‘Learner language and teacher talk’, AVLJ 16, 1, 1978, pp. 5-13.
J.A. Norrish, Language Learners and their Errors, Macmillan, 1983.

-143-

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Teaching English as a Foreign Language
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chapter 1 - English in the World Today 1
  • Chapter 2 - In the Classroom 12
  • Chapter 3 - Language and Communication 25
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 36
  • Chapter 4 - Basic Principles 37
  • Chapter 5 - Pronunciation 49
  • Chapter 6 - Listening and Speaking 65
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 88
  • Chapter 7 - Reading 89
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 115
  • Chapter 8 - Writing 116
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 131
  • Chapter 9 - Errors, Correction and Remedial Work 133
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 143
  • Chapter 10 - Assessment and Examinations 145
  • Chapter 11 - Young Children Learning English 166
  • Chapter 12 - Learning English in the Secondary School 174
  • Chapter 13 - Teaching English to Adults 187
  • Chapter 14 - The English Department 201
  • Appendix 1 211
  • Appendix 2 212
  • Glossary of Selected Terms 214
  • Bibliography 233
  • Useful Periodicals 240
  • Index 241
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