Investigating Mathematics Teaching: A Constructivist Enquiry

By Barbara Jaworski | Go to book overview

Chapter 9

Ben: Affirming the Teaching Triad

I chose to observe Ben as part of my Phase 3 study because he was an experienced teacher with a declared aim to implement in his classroom ‘an investigative approach to teaching and learning mathematics’. We had run jointly a course for teachers with this title when Ben had been an ESG advisory teacher a few years earlier. 1 He had recently taken up a post as head of mathematics at Compton, a small secondary-modern school in a rural area.

I believed that we had significant common vocabulary. I also knew him to be reflective, taking Locke’s definition—‘the ability of the mind to observe its own operations’. 2 Thus I believed that we could join in critical discussions about an investigative approach related to the classroom practice in which he was engaged.


Background

It was Ben’s second year as head of mathematics at Compton. Before he had arrived, approaches to mathematics teaching had mainly involved direct instruction. 3 Ben had introduced an investigative approach in his own classes, and was in the process of introducing a scheme of work which would encourage other teachers to become involved in investigational work. Year groups in the school were set for mathematics, but there was nevertheless a considerable range of ability in any class.

Ben’s developing scheme of work for mathematics lessons at all levels was not based on any published text, but he used such texts for various purposes at different levels. There was no split between ‘published scheme’ and ‘classwork’ lessons as there had been at both Amberley and Beacham. All lessons were designed by the teacher himself, and in comparison with the other two schools they were all class work lessons. This meant that all students worked from the same starting point, but flexibility within the structure of lessons meant that they could diverge in emphasis once a particular activity had begun. Occasionally, lessons were labelled ‘coursework’ lessons, and in these students developed some area of work into an extended piece of course work for GCSE purposes. I gained little impression of how this pattern extended to other teachers’ lessons within the school.

I observed Ben teaching a Year 10 class, which he had himself chosen for observation because he had already been teaching them for a year and felt they

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Investigating Mathematics Teaching: A Constructivist Enquiry
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.