Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Sir Thomas Malory: The Critical Heritage

By Marylyn Parins | Go to book overview

which if they could have been found, might have saved Richard Robinson the trouble of translating Leland’s Assertio, etc. into English. But, in truth, honest William was only T. Malory’s printer, as has been already observed.

6.

Biographia Britannica

1747-1766

This work, often cited through the early nineteenth century, is subtitled ‘The Lives of the Most Eminent Persons who have flourished in Great Britain and Ireland from the earliest Ages, down to the present Times’; it is ‘digested in the manner’ of Bale’s history. A number of its articles, including the one on Caxton in which this selection appears, are attributed to William Oldys (1696-1761), antiquary, bibliographer, editor, and biographer, whose most important work was perhaps his life of Ralegh (1736) and who worked with Samuel Johnson on the cataloguing of the Harleian library.

Oldys introduces the notion, repeated through successive decades, that Malory was a priest; he also attributes the popularity of the Morte Darthur to its loose standards of morality. The entry appears in volume II (London: W. Innys, 1748; reprinted Hildesheim: G. Olms, 1969), 1243.

But what was accounted his [Caxton’s] capital work this year [1485], is a large thick volume, intituled, The Byrth, Lyf, and Actes of King Arthur; of his noble Knyghtes of the Round Table, their marvayllous Enquestes and Adventures; th Achyeviyng of the Sang real; and in the end, Le Morte D’Arthur; with the dolorous Deth and Departyng out of thys World of them Al. Whiche book was reduced to the Englisshe by Syr Thomas Malory, Knight, and by me (William Caxton) divyded into twenty one bookes; chaptyred and emprynted, and fynysshed in th’ Abbey Westmestre, the last day of July, the yere of our Lord 1485. That Sir Thomas Malory seems to have drawn this

-64-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sir Thomas Malory: The Critical Heritage
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 410

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.