Political Ideas in Modern Britain: In and after the Twentieth Century

By Rodney Barker | Go to book overview

5

The pale of the constitution

The idea of citizenship

DEMOCRATS AND ELITISTS

Alarm, despair and defiance had been expressed in response to the extensions of public power, and the growth of the state had been the central and overshadowing fact for a vast body of political argument throughout the latter part of the nineteenth and the early part of the twentieth century. But there were other reasons why many people were alarmed at the course of affairs in the half century which fell on either side of 1900. Both the growing action of the state on the one hand, and the extension of the franchise, the growth of popular parties, and the proposals of social reformers, socialists and social radicals on the other, implied a redistribution of power, wealth and status. In response to this, criticism of the state was joined by criticism of democracy or as it was frequently called, popular government. The two attacks, though normally associated, were distinct.

There was nothing new in much of this criticism. The unfitness of the masses for the exercise of power had been a theme running throughout nineteenth-century discussion and Carlyle and Arnold, Bagehot and James Stephen had all in their different ways contributed to this tradition. Others too who did not reject democracy as a political form looked to more select underlying arrangements to make the form work. Mallock argued that ‘in any great country pure democracy is impossible’ and that ‘democracy is impossible unless the principle of oligarchy is its concomitant’ (Mallock 1918:378). Despite Shaw’s long arguments with Mallock, this was not so different a principle from that assumed by many of the early Fabians, and particularly by Shaw himself. But these socialist elitists differed from elitists who attacked democracy, both in their approval of the forms of popular government and in their enthusiasm for the extension of state function which they believed went with it. The tradition of democratic oligarchy

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Political Ideas in Modern Britain: In and after the Twentieth Century
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 352

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.