Political Ideas in Modern Britain: In and after the Twentieth Century

By Rodney Barker | Go to book overview

9

The death of socialism and the rise of the left

SOCIALISM, RADICALISM, AND THE LEFT

Towards the end of 1994 a volume of essays appeared on the future of the left (D. Miliband 1994). That in itself was not remarkable. Several such volumes appeared each year, with various titles and authors, discussing the underlying principles and purposes of radical politics, assessing recent successes and failures in achieving, pursuing or catching sight of goals, and considering the sorts of policies most likely to achieve them in the future. The right may not have been the stupid party, but compared with the left it had always been the reticent one. And especially in the years after the emergence of the New Left, the left had been the party of publication. Journals and publishing houses multiplied, there were years books, anthologies, series and collections. The Socialist Register, published annually, institutionalized the process, but it was by no means the only contributor to the debate. The left, as reformists, were more inclined regularly to look to the future—their own and the country’s—than were the right. They were after all seeking to improve the condition of the country and of its institutions in the light of either principles or example. The right, at least up until the demise of conservatism, were only trying to keep things more or less as they were. The appearance of volumes of articles and essays, by one, two or a collection of authors, was part of the annual round of political discussion. To that extent, there was nothing unusual about Reinventing the Left. What distinguished the volume edited in 1994 by David Miliband was the almost complete absence from its pages of the word ‘socialism’.

The contributors to Reinventing the Left covered the principal topics which socialists would have covered, but did so from the perspective of values and rhetoric which presented a case both wider than the old socialist one, and more eclectic in its frame of ethical reference. The

-251-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Political Ideas in Modern Britain: In and after the Twentieth Century
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 352

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.