Environmental Impact Assessment: Theory and Practice

By Peter Wathern | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This venture has provided me with an opportunity to renew some old friendships and hopefully to cultivate some new ones. The primary acknowledgement, of course, must be to the contributors for the way they have responded with characteristic good humour and indulgence to my alarmingly short deadlines and unreasonable pedantry. I hope they feel that the final result does justice to their efforts. I should like to thank my former colleagues at CEMP, Aberdeen University, who have collaborated in the production of this volume, namely Brian Clark, Paul Tomlinson and especially Ron Bisset who provided some invaluable introductions at the outset when the structure of the book was being discussed. Special thanks should also go to the Director of IIUG, Prof. Udo Simonis, for his support and encouragement during the preparation of this volume.

Ros Laidlaw provided the graphics and I duly acknowledge her skills. Not least, I should like to thank Julie Wathern for her invaluable assistance during the preparation and editing of the final manuscript, and Andrea Wathern for compiling the index.

PETER WATHERN

Berlin, December 1986

We are grateful to the following individuals and organizations who have kindly given permission for the reproduction of copyright material (figure numbers in parentheses):

Figures 1.3 & 1.7 reproduced from Landscape and urban planning by P. Wathern et al., by permission of Elsevier; Figure 1.8 reproduced from Environmental policy analysis: operational methods and models, by P. Nijkamp, by permission of John Wiley & Sons Ltd copyright © 1980; Figure 3.4 reproduced from Ecological Modelling, 3(3), Gilliland & Risser (eds), by permission of Elsevier; Tables 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4, 9.5, 9.6, 9.7, 9.8, reproduced by permission of Academic Press.

-ix-

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