A Century of British Painters

By Samuel Redgrave; Richard Redgrave | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIV
LESLIE, NEWTON, AND EGG

IN concluding the early life of our three drama-painters, we left Leslie, a student of the Royal Academy, using his best leisure to perfect his art-education; and adding to his means by painting the portraits of his American friends. The art of his two countrymen, Allston and West, had so impressed him that his first attempts were in the grand style; and even when descending from 'Saul and the Witch of Endor', to Shakespeare, he turned to the historic plays rather than to the comedies, his subject being 'The Death of Rutland'. The former of these works the governors of the British Institution, with their usual sagacity, turned out of the gallery; the latter, after exhibition at the Royal Academy, where Leslie tells us it had an 'excellent situation', was purchased for the city of Philadelphia, his American home. In 1817 he paid a visit of two months to Paris, Brussels, and Antwerp, making diligent study of the pictures by the old masters; and in 1818 he made a journey into the south of England, where he obtained much insight into the characteristics of rural life. As the year advanced he began to find that the true bent of his genius was neither for historical nor religious art, but for humorous comedy; which he treated with beauty and character of a far more refined kind than either of the distinguished painters we have classed with him. The same year he painted a small picture of 'Slender and Anne Page', from the Merry Wives of Windsor; a comedy which afterwards afforded subjects for some of his finest works.

He tells us that, on his return from Devonshire in 1818, he painted for his friend, Mr. Dunlop (to whose then residence in Dawlish his visit had been made), the picture of 'Sir Roger de Coverley going to Church accompanied by the Spectator', which was very popular in the exhibition of 1819. That Washington Irving, his great friend, suggested the subject is more than likely. Perhaps there is no scene so full of episodes of peaceful beauty and kindly feeling as the gathering together of a rural population to the service of a village church; no doubt Irving and Leslie in their rambles through the land had seen many similar scenes; and it was a happy thought that led the painter to a kindred subject from one of England's classic authors, and including in the Bachelor Knight one of the most genial creations

-333-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Century of British Painters
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 612

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.