A Century of British Painters

By Samuel Redgrave; Richard Redgrave | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXVII
THE LANDSCAPE PAINTERS--CONSTABLE,
CALLCOTT AND COLLINS

TURNER, of whom we have already spoken, was not without contemporaries, distinguished men practising the same branch of art, yet in a manner quite their own, and aiming at original excellence. Of these John Constable, R.A., was remarkable as the first who wholly emancipated himself from the schools. His art is purely and thoroughly English. Turner, in his early works at least, built much on the art of Claude and Poussin; so did Callcott. Gainsborough, English as he was in almost every phase of his art, was not clear of the dark masters and the 'brown tree' school. Morland was a Dutchman in subject, and in the mode of composing his pictures. Crome built upon Ruysdael and Hobbema. But Constable began with studying nature; he was ever deep in the love of it, and ended as he began. His nature, too, was English nature; he never visited Italy; he did not even care for the mountain and the torrent of his own land, but he loved the flat pastures and the slow streams of his native Suffolk.

Constable was born at East Bergholt, Suffolk, on 11 June 1776. He was the son of a wealthy miller, who had inherited considerable property. He was first intended for the Church. Then his father tried to make a miller of him, but he had a loving preference for art, and after a year he was left to follow his own bent. In 1795 he came to London. In 1799 he was admitted a student of the Royal Academy; and in 1802 we find him exhibiting his first picture. Soon gaining confidence in his own powers, he wrote in the following year, 'I feel now more than ever a decided conviction that I shall some time or other make some good pictures--pictures that shall be valuable to posterity if I do not reap the benefit of them'. He made one or two attempts at history, then lost much time in painting portraits, the only art which he found paid, and at last settled down to his true art, as a landscape painter. In 1819 he gained his election as associate; and ten years later his full membership.

The banks of the Stour made him, he owns, a painter. He treated the nature which he saw in a thoroughly original manner, and he chose it under an aspect that had previously been overlooked. Landscape painters had hitherto usually painted with the sun at their backs,

-365-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Century of British Painters
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 612

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.