France and Germany at Maastricht: Politics and Negotiations to Create the European Union

By Colette Mazzucelli | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

For his patience and critical comments on this manuscript, the author owes a debt of gratitude to her mentor, Professor Emeritus Karl H. Cerny, and to his wife, Constance Cerny. She would also like to thank Professor Thomas Banchoff, Department of Government, Georgetown University and Professors Gregory Flynn and Lily Gardner Feldman, Center for Excellence in German and European Studies, Georgetown University.

In addition, numerous scholars in the United States and Europe have assisted the author during the course of her research. These individuals are: Professor Stanley Hoffmann, Center for European Studies, Harvard University; Professor Pierre-Henri Laurent, Department of History, Tufts University; Professor Alfred Grosser, Fondation Nationale des Sciences Politiques, Paris; Professor Joseph Rovan, Université de Paris; Professor Jean Klein, Institut Français des Relations Internationales (IFRI); Professor Christian Lequesne, Institut d’Etudes Politiques, Paris; Professor Wolfgang Wessels, Universität zu Köln; Professor Elfriede Regelsberger, Institut für Europäische Politik; Dr. Robert Picht, Deutsch-Französisches Institut, Ludwigsburg; Dr. Ingo Kolboom, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Auswärtige Politik (DGAP), Bonn; and Professor Roger Morgan, European University Institute, Florence.

Other individuals “working for Europe” were likewise generous with their time during my stays in Paris, Brussels and Bonn. Special appreciation is conveyed to Ambassador Alfred Cahen, Embassy of Belgium, Paris; Jean De Ruyt, Belgian Foreign Ministry, Brussels; Dr. Giuseppe Ciavarini Azzi and Dr. John Fitzmaurice, Secretariat General, European Commission, Brussels; and Dr. Thomas Grunert, Secretariat, European Parliament, Luxembourg.

Financial support from the Franco-American (Fulbright) Commission in Paris, the European Commission in Brussels, the Jean Monnet Council in Washington, D.C. and the Robert Bosch Foundation in Stuttgart made this book possible. Ambassador J. Robert Schaetzel and his wife, Imogen Schaetzel, of the Jean Monnet Council and Clifford P. Hackett provided valuable comments and criticisms during various stages of my research. Anneliese Eberle offered gracious assistance during my time at the Auswärtiges Amt. Tania von Uslar Gleichen, Rita Galambos, Julia Monar and

-xv-

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