Introducing English Grammar

By David J. Young | Go to book overview

Notes on further reading

For discussions of the notion of ‘correctness’ and the status of usage, see Quirk (1968), especially chapters 5, 7 and 8 and Appendix II which is by J. Warburg.

The inevitability of linguistic change, and the social and psychological pressures which bring it about, are the subject of Aitchison (1981).

Most introductions to linguistics contain a discussion and a rejection of ‘prescriptivism’ in an early chapter. Lyons (1981) is a good example. A book which attempts to bridge the gap between popular and academic conceptions of language study is Bolinger (1980).

Introductions to linguistics usually also contain discussions of dialect and register; for instance, Halliday, McIntosh and Strevens (1964), chapter 4. A small book devoted to the concept of register is Gregory and Carroll (1978). On dialects, see Hughes and Trudgill (1979).

For further reading on the analysis of English grammar, the most useful compendious treatment is Quirk et al. (1972), and its abridgement, Quirk and Greenbaum (1973). These contain a large number of references to works on particular grammatical topics. My own book, Young (1980), has a fairly detailed study of a relatively limited area. The amount of overlap with the coverage of the present work has been kept to a minimum.

Crystal (1980) is a useful source of explanations for linguistic terminology and is obviously much more comprehensive than the glossary of this book.


References
Aitchison, J. (1981), Language Change: progress or decay?, London: Fontana
Bolinger, D. (1980), Language: The Loaded Weapon, London: Longman
Crystal, D. (1985), A Dictionary of Linguistics and Phonetics (2nd edn, updated and enlarged), Oxford: Blackwell/André Deutsch
Crystal, D. and Davy, D. (1975), Advanced English Conversation, London: Longman
Gregory, M. and Carroll, S. (1978), Language and Situation, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul
Halliday, M.A.K., McIntosh, A. and Strevens, P. (1964). The Linguistic Sciences and Language Teaching, London: Longman
Hughes, A. and Trudgill, P. (1979), English Accents and Dialects, London: Arnold
Lyons, J. (1981), Language and Linguistics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Quirk, R. (1968), The Use of English, 2nd edn, London: Longman
Quirk, R., Greenbaum, S., Leech, G.N., and Svartvik, J. (1972), A Grammar of Contemporary English, London: Longman
Quirk, R. and Greenbaum, S. (1973), A University Grammar of English, London: Longman
Wilkins, D.A. (1972), Linguistics in Language Teaching, London: Arnold
Young, D.J. (1980), The Structure of English Clauses, London: Hutchinson

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Introducing English Grammar
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Acknowledgements 7
  • Preface 8
  • 1 - Introduction 11
  • 2 - Nouns and Noun Phrases 18
  • 3 - Verbs and Verb Phrases 36
  • 4 - Adjectives and Adjective Phrases 54
  • 5 - Sentences 71
  • Glossary 89
  • Notes on Further Reading 102
  • Index 119
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