Introducing English Grammar

By David J. Young | Go to book overview

Index

a
absolute 91, 92
abstract concept 24, 66
abstraction 25, 98
accent 89
action 65, 94
active 44, 81 -3, 101, 116
active clause 101
active verb phrase 101
active voice 81
act of communication 77, 90, 96
actor 83
addressee 29, 41, 77 - 80, 86, 88, 90, 96, 99, 117
adjectival function 69, 96
adjectival head 54, 58
adjectival ing-form 59 - 61, 69
adjectival modifier 20, 32
adjectival n-form 61 -2, 69
adjective 16, 20, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 44, 49, 54 - 70, 71, 75, 76, 77, 89, 90, 93, 94, 95, 97, 99, 111, 114, 115 ;
as complement 54 -5;
as head of noun phrase 64 ;
as modifier 20, 32, 44, 55, 59 ;
classifying 59 ;
colour 58 -9;
comparison of 57 -8;
complementation of 62 -4;
compound 61, 67 ;
derived 66 ;
dynamic 65 ;
gradability of 56 -8;
in attributive function 55, 61 -2, 63 -4;
in predicative function 54 -5, 61 -2;
inflection of 55 -6;
intensification of 56 -7;
non-gradable 58 -9;
stative 65 ;
superlative 58, 99 ;
with no attributive function 65 ;
with no predicative function 65
adjective phrase 47, 54 - 70, 71, 73, 77, 89, 90, 91, 93, 94, 97, 99 ;
as ascriptive complement 73 ;
as complement 54, 73 ;
head of 54, 55, 58 ;
modifier in 54, 77
adjunct 37, 42, 62, 71, 74 -5, 77 -8, 84 -5, 87, 88, 89, 90, 98, 116 -17
adverb 16, 74 -7, 89, 95, 117
adverb as modifier 77
adverb of frequency 75, 89
adverb of manner 75, 89
adverb of place 75, 89
adverb of time 89
adverb phrase 71, 74, 76, 77, 89, 94
adverbial 89
adverbial particle 45, 52, 89, 96
adverbial phrase 77
advice 80, 90
affected 60, 83
affected entity 96
affix 26 -7, 89, 92, 99
agent 96
agreement 42, 52, 74, 89, 90, 91, 93, 95, 99, 101, 109, 112
Aitchison, J. 102
alternative interrogative 79, 87, 94, 116
anaphora, anaphoric 31, 35, 84, 86, 89, 90, 99
animate 45
antonym 57 -8, 67, 90
apostrophe 24, 34
appropriateness 14, 90 -1
article 58
ascriptive complement 72 -4, 90 -1, 94
asserted 96
assertion 94
attitude 76, 97
attribute 52, 86, 90
attributive 55, 58 -9, 63 -5, 89 - 90
attributive ing-form 61, 68
attributive n-form 61
auxiliary, auxiliary verb 38 -9, 44, 78, 79 - 81, 90, 92, 95, 96, 101
auxiliary position 78
auxiliary-subject inversion 79

b
back reference 29 - 31, 57 -8, 90
base 39, 42
base form 15, 38 - 42, 78, 90, 94, 100, 101, 108
basic sentence pattern 71, 75, 91
beneficiary 73, 94
Bolinger, D. 102
borrowing 22, 26 -7, 95

c
capital letter 51
Carroll, S. 102
case 23, 29, 33, 90, 93, 101

-119-

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Introducing English Grammar
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Acknowledgements 7
  • Preface 8
  • 1 - Introduction 11
  • 2 - Nouns and Noun Phrases 18
  • 3 - Verbs and Verb Phrases 36
  • 4 - Adjectives and Adjective Phrases 54
  • 5 - Sentences 71
  • Glossary 89
  • Notes on Further Reading 102
  • Index 119
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