An Introduction to the Social History of Nursing

By Robert Dingwall; Anne Marie Rafferty et al. | Go to book overview
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Acknowledgements

A book like this necessarily draws on the work of many colleagues whose hard labour on primary sources has provided the foundation on which we could build. We would like to thank a number of friends and associates in Oxford and elsewhere who have not only commented on drafts but also contributed generously from their own unpublished researches. Among them we should particularly mention Kate Robinson, who prompted the whole project, Irvine Loudon, Elizabeth Peretz, Alastair Gray, Phil Strong, Malcolm Colledge, Peter Bartrip, Miranda Mugford, John Keown, Celia Davies, Mick Carpenter, Pat Hearn, and Renata Langford. We would particularly like to thank Anne Summers for advance reference to her book Angels and Citizens: British Women as Military Nurses 1854-1914 (Summers 1988). We would also like to thank Margaret Lynch and Anne Wiles for their consumers’ reactions to early drafts, and Linda Peterson and Jeanette Price who typed the manuscript.

The preparation of this book was supported by a contract from the Distance Learning Centre at South Bank Polytechnic.

-vi-

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