An Introduction to the Social History of Nursing

By Robert Dingwall; Anne Marie Rafferty et al. | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1Nurses and Servants
1.
Larson’ s approach is very similar to that of most economists who define a profession as a type of legally protected monopoly in the supply of certain services (e.g. Forgotson and Cook 1967, Hodgson 1977, Smith et al. 1979, cf. Dingwall and Fenn 1987, Gray 1987).
2.
Unfortunately Reverby’s (1987) account of the development of American nursing only became available in the UK as this book was being completed. There are, however, many striking parallels in the development of nursing in the two countries, in this early period and later, which reflect the constraints on caring work in a market society. In each case, the historical record has also been substantially mythologized to obscure the contribution of ordinary working-class women to that work.

Chapter 2The Revolution in Nursing
1.
Army medicine, in both Britain and France, was something of an exception to the stagnation of technical development during the eighteenth century, partly at least because it was the one sector where doctors were not beholden to their patients and had the authority to impose treatments (Jewson 1974:384-5).
2.
Louisa Twining was a daughter of the family of tea merchants, who formed the Workhouse Visiting Society in 1858, ‘to promote the moral and spiritual improvement of workhouse inmates’. This had 140 members visiting 12 London workhouses in 1860 and several provincial branches (Abel-Smith 1960:38). It provided a network of contacts out of which grew a small number of other associations for the assistance of workhouse children, the support of unmarried mothers and the rehabilitation of prostitutes (Crowther 1981:68-70).

Chapter 3The New Model Nurse
1.
Octavia Hill (1838-1912) was a prominent member of the movement to reform housing conditions for the poor both by the provision of

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An Introduction to the Social History of Nursing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Glossary of Abbreviations vii
  • Chapter One - Nurses and Servants 1
  • Chapter Two - The Revolution in Nursing 19
  • Chapter Three - The New Model Nurse 35
  • Chapter Four - Making the Myths 48
  • Chapter Five - The Search for Unity 77
  • Chapter Six - The Nationalization of Nursing 98
  • Chapter Seven - Mental Disorder and Mental Handicap 123
  • Chapter Eight - Midwifery 145
  • Chapter Nine - District Nursing and Health Visiting 173
  • Chapter Ten - Professional Autonomy and Economic Constraints 204
  • Notes 230
  • References 236
  • Index 251
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