Nat Turner: A Slave Rebellion in History and Memory

By Kenneth S. Greenberg | Go to book overview

TEN
“What Happened in This Place?”
In Search of the Female Slave in the Nat Turner Slave Insurrection
MARY KEMP DAVIS

As she [Mrs. Barrow] fled[,] a negro girl, named Lucy, seized her with the determination of holding her for the rebels, but “Aunt” Easter came to the aid of her mistress and fled with her to the woods.

Martha Waller was concealed by the nurse under the large apron, but the child would not endure the reckless destruction of furniture, so [she] arose and threatened to tell her father. One of the negroes seized her and dashed her to death against the ground.

William Sidney Drewry, The Southampton Insurrection1

The trial records compiled by Henry Irving Tragle in The Southampton Slave Revolt of 1831: A Compilation of Source Material do not mention a single female slave who rode with Nat Turner and his men as they swept through lower Southampton County, Virginia, 22–23 August 1831. They do hint that the wife of a free black was perhaps a coconspirator since she was seen with the insurgents at one site. This unnamed woman was with her husband, Billy Artist, when he and other insurgents stopped by a slaveholder's home on Tuesday, 23 August. Like other rebels, Artist was probably on horseback, and his wife, whether free or enslaved, may have been riding a horse as well. No further information is given about this shadowy woman, such as what she said or did at the scene—if anything. Artist was jailed for conspiracy and seems to have committed suicide while incarcerated; his wife's fate is unrecorded. 2

The mystery surrounding Billy Artist's wife is emblematic of the mystery surrounding all of the female slaves who lived in lower Southampton

-162-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nat Turner: A Slave Rebellion in History and Memory
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 289

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.