A Modern History of Japan: From Tokugawa Times to the Present

By Andrew Gordon | Go to book overview

Notes

NOTES TO CHAPTER 1
1
Cited in Mikiso Hane, Peasants, Rebels, and Outcastes: The Underside of Modern Japan (New York: Pantheon Books, 1982), p. 8.
2
Engelbert Kaempfer, Kaempfer's Japan, ed. and trans. Beatrice M. Bodart Bailey (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1999), p. 271. Kaempfer was a German scholar who spent the years 1690 to 1692 with Dutch traders at their outpost in Nagasaki.
3
James Murdoch and George Sansom cited in George Elison, “The Cross and the Sword,” in Warlords, Artists, and Commoners: Japan in the Sixteenth Century, ed. George Elison and Barwell L. Smith (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1981), pp. 67–68.
4
A. L. Sadler, The Maker of Modern Japan: The Life of Tokugawa Ieyasu (1937; reprint, Rutland, Vt.: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1984), p. 25.
5
With the division of some domains and promotion of some direct vassals to daimyō status, the number of daimyō increased over time, stabilizing at about 260 in the eighteenth century.
6
A koku is a unit of measure equivalent to about 180 liters.
7
The Journal of Townsend Harris (Tokyo: Kinkōdō Shoseki, 1913), pp. 468–80.
8
James L. McClain, Kanazawa: A Seventeenth-Century Japanese Castle Town (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1982), p. 151.
9
The regulations also had an unintended consequence important to historians. Like the data stored in parishes of early modern Europe, the population records collected in Japan's temple registers provided the raw materials in recent decades for sophisticated analysis of demographic and social history.
10
Bob Tadashi Wakabayashi, Anti-Foreignism and Western Learning in Early-Modern Japan: The New Theses of 1825 (Cambridge: Harvard Council on East Asian Studies, 1986), p. 149.
11
John W. Hall, “Rule by Status in Tokugawa Japan,” Journal of Japanese Studies 1, no. 1 (Fall 1974): 39–49.

NOTES TO CHAPTER 2
1
See John W. Hall, “The Castle Town and Japan's Modern Urbanization,” in Studies in the Institutional History of Early Modern Japan, ed. JohnW. Hall and Marius Jansen (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1968).
2
Cited in Michael Cooper, They Came to Japan: An Anthology of European Reports on Japan, 1543–1640 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1965), p. 292.
3
All quotes are taken from Yasumi Roan, “Ryokō Yojinshū,” as translated and introduced in Constantine N. Vaporis, “Caveat Viator: Advice to Travelers in the Edo Period,” Monumenta Nipponica 44, no. 4 (Winter 1989): 461–83.

-345-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Modern History of Japan: From Tokugawa Times to the Present
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 384

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.