Votes for Women: The Struggle for Suffrage Revisited

By Jean H. Baker | Go to book overview

creative nineteenth-century movements that were nurtured in the West— Mormonism and Populism—may have hampered the cause of suffrage in the rest of the nation. National leaders like Susan B. Anthony and Lucy Stone were keenly aware of the stigma attached to suffrage by those with deep antipathies toward Mormonism and the political left. Yet they were unable to break these links in the eastern public mind.

At the same time, western women's choices as voters immediately became part of the controversy over suffrage itself. When Utah enfranchised women, those women who voted Republican risked being viewed as traitors to Mormonism, while the large majorities of Mormon women who voted to support their church confirmed the belief, already held by many Americans, that female voters would be easily manipulated or shamelessly immoral. Helen Kendrick Johnson, conservative author of Women and the Republic (1897), argued vehemently against woman suffrage on the grounds that Colorado women had shown themselves to be Populists, socialists, and anarchists—practitioners of a “strain of exalted fanaticism.” At the same time, the results of the 1894 campaign persuaded People's Party leaders that the majority of Colorado women were Republicans and traitors to the Populist cause.

The success of suffrage in the West was no mean achievement. It enabled thousands of American women to cast their ballots and participate in campaigns—and a few to serve in elected office—before 1920. By the 1910s, western suffrage helped advance the national cause simply through the rising number of states where women voted and these voters' growing visibility and clout. In granting women's political rights, the West experienced early all the opportunities and dilemmas that would emerge later nationwide. The West served notice to the nation, early on, that women could be effective organizers in the political arena. Western women showed that they cared deeply about politics and could be strong partisans in the midst of critical campaigns. They seldom united in one party; diverse women had many different priorities and loyalties. And western women showed that they could think for themselves, often straying from the party-line paths that men wanted them to tread.


NOTE
1
All quotes in this chapter are from Rebecca Edwards, Angels in the Machinery: Gender in American Party Politics from the Civil War to the Progressive Era (New York: Oxford University Press, 1997), 91–110.

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Votes for Women: The Struggle for Suffrage Revisited
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 199

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.