And a Time for Hope: Americans in the Great Depression

By James R. McGovern | Go to book overview

Selected Bibliography

The most important sources for this study are in the Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York, for the Roosevelt Family Papers, the Harry Hopkins Papers and the President's Personal File and the Library of Congress for the Life Histories, Ethnic and Folklore materials of the Federal Writer's Project and thousands of photographs in the Library's Prints and Photographs Division. Access to copious materials of the Federal Writer's Project has been facilitated by the ready availability of life histories for the South via microfilm from the University of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill. The National Archives in Washington, DC, along with its state repositories provided copies of congressional hearings. The Michigan State University Voice Archives presented valuable holdings in radio scripts. Newspapers have been indispensable, especially The New York Times and the Chicago Defender, along with a host of small-town and small-city newspapers for insights on rural America in the 1930s. These included the Elba (AL) Clipper, Grand Rapids (MN) Herald Review, Augusta (KS) Daily Gazette, Bozeman (MT) Daily Chronicle, DeKalb (IL) Chronicle, Chillicothe (MO) Constitution-Tribune, Pendleton East Oregonian, Brattleboro (VT) Daily Reformer, Beloit (KS) Daily Call, Taylor County (FL) News and Bismarck, (ND) Tribune. All are available on microfilm.

A large amount of source material came through published works, all referred to in the abundant end notes of this study. These included, of course, numerous books by members of President Roosevelt's family and the president's associates in the White House. Very valuable insights came from Eleanor Roosevelt and sons Eliot and James Roosevelt. Also useful were comments and observations of seasoned reporters in newspapers and magazines. Post office murals of the 1930s, pictured in studies by Karal Marling and Sue Bridwell Beckham, and accompanied by their interpretations have enriched perspectives for the theories of this book. Polls and statistics, amply available in the 1930s, also helped round out interpretations.

For rural America a series of thoughtful reports by observers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, all living in the small communities, were helpful in devel

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And a Time for Hope: Americans in the Great Depression
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • And a Time for Hope - Americans in the Great Depression *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • 1 - A Troubled Nation, 1929-1934 *
  • 2 - The President *
  • 3 - The New Deal *
  • 4 - The American Scene *
  • 5 - Small Worlds Sustained *
  • 6 - Rural Worlds Confirmed *
  • 7 - African Americans in the Cotton South *
  • 8 - Seeing Tomorrow *
  • 9 - Americans Go to the Movies *
  • 10 - Americans Listen at Home *
  • 11 - American Workers *
  • 12 - Urban Support Systems *
  • 13 - Appeal of the Great Cities *
  • 14 - Conclusion *
  • Notes *
  • Selected Bibliography *
  • Index *
  • About the Author *
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