Dance History: An Introduction

By Janet Adshead-Lansdale; June Layson | Go to book overview

Illustrations
1.1 Three dimensional model used as the basis for engaging in dance history. 5
1.2 Dimension A - dance through time and different modes of study 6
1.3 Dimension B - dance types. 7
1.4 Subdivision of dance types. 7
1.5 Theatre dance and its various sub-categories 8
1.6 Dimension C - dance contexts. 9
1.7 Subdivision of dance contexts. 9
1.8 Model of the subject area for dance history. 10
7.1 Composite of Sacre sketches. The one on the left is by Valentine Gross-Hugo, drawn in the dark during a performance at the Théâtre des Champs Elysées in 1913. The sketch on the right is by Millicent Hodson, deciphered for the reconstruction, as the Old Woman leaping behind a group of Youths and Young People. Act I, scene i, ‘Augurs of Spring’ (1913 drawing courtesy of Jean Hugo). 103
7.2 La Chatte, dance score, scene iv, ‘Danse de la Chatte’. Page from a reconstruction notebook. 106-7
7.3 Le Sacre du printemps page from piano score marked with Marie Rambert’s notes from the 1913 rehearsals, showing musical cues for the repetitive falls. Act II, scene iii, ‘Evocation of the ancestors’. (Courtesy of the Rambert Dance Company Archives.) 110
9.1 Publicity material for Ballet Rambert’s first season at the Lyric Hammersmith in 1930. (Courtesy of the Rambert Dance Company Archives.) 134
9.2 L’Après-midi d’un faune: 1931 at the Ballet Club. William Chappell as the Faun and Diana Gould as the Chief Nymph. Choreography: Vaslav Nijinsky; music: Claude Debussy; design: Léon Bakst. (Courtesy of the Rambert Dance Company Archives.) 141
10.1 Mary Wigman in Hexentanz (Witch Dance), 1914. 157
10.2 Wigman in Schwingende Landschaft (Shifting Landscape), 1929. 163
10.3 Wigman in Mütterlicher Tanz nach Frauentänze (Maternal Dance from Women’s Dance Cycle), 1934. 165
15.1 Dynamic model summarizing procedures for writing dance history. 245

-vii-

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