Dance History: An Introduction

By Janet Adshead-Lansdale; June Layson | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
The select bibliography lists recommended reading about the original ballets and reconstructions discussed in this essay. We have restricted the recommended books to general texts about the companies and choreographers. Articles about reconstructions are limited to those which primarily deal with working methods. In the notes that follow, production details of each work are given to correspond with the first reference in the text. All reconstructions, except L’Après-midi d’un faune, are by the authors.

Le Sacre du printemps: scenario, Nicholas Roerich and Igor Stravinsky; music, Stravinsky; decor and costumes, Roerich; choreography, Vaslav Nijinsky. Première: 29 May 1913, by Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, Théâtre des Champs-Elysées, Paris.

Reconstruction première: 30 September 1987, by Joffrey Ballet, the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. Second staging: 3 April 1991, by Paris Opéra Ballet, Palais Garnier, Paris. Third staging: 11 March 1994, Finnish Ballet, Finnish National Opera, Helsinki.

Video of Joffrey production: The Search for Nijinsky’s Rite of Spring, WNET/ THIRTEEN with BBC2 and La Sept; première: 24 November 1989, New York.

2
L’Après-midi d’un faune: scenario and choreography, Vaslav Nijinsky; music, Claude Debussy; decor and costumes, Léon Bakst. Première: 29 May 1912, by Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris.

Reconstruction première: 11 April 1989, Beppe Menegatti and Carla Fracci production with Teatro di San Carlo, Naples. Second staging: 27 October 1989, Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, Salle Wilfrid-Pelletier, Montreal. Third staging: 8 December 1989, Julliard School, New York.

Video of Julliard production: A Revival of Nijinsky’s Original L’Après-midi d’un faune, Harwood Academic Publishers, London and New York.

3
Jeux: scenario and choreography, Vaslav Nijinsky; music, Claude Debussy; decor and costumes, Léon Bakst. Première: 15 May 1913, Théâtre des Champs-Elysées, Paris.
4
Till Eulenspiegel: scenario, Richard Strauss and Vaslav Nijinsky; music, Richard Strauss; decor and costumes, Robert Edmond Jones; choreography, Nijinsky. Première: 23 October 1916, by Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, Manhattan Opera House, New York.

Reconstruction première: 9 February 1994, by Paris Opéra Ballet, Palais Garnier, Paris.

5
La Chatte: scenario, Boris Kochno (Sobeka); music, Henri Sauguet; decor and costumes, Naum Gabo and Antoine Pevsner; choreography, George Balanchine. Première, 30 April 1927, by Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, Théâtre de Monte-Carlo, Monte-Carlo.

Reconstruction première: 3 May 1991, by Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, Salle Wilfrid-Pelletier, Montreal.

6
Cotillon: scenario, Boris Kochno; music, Emmanuel Chabrier, orchestrated by Chabrier, Felix Mottl and Vittorio Rieti; decor and costumes, Christian Bérard; choreography, George Balanchine. Première: 17 January 1932, by Colonel Vassili de Basil’s Ballets Russes, Théâtre de Monte-Carlo, Monte-Carlo.

Reconstruction première: 26 October 1988, by Joffrey Ballet, City Center Theater, New York.

7
La Concurrence: scenario, decor and costumes, André Derain; music, Georges Auric; choreography, George Balanchine. Première: 17 January 1932, by

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